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Title: Radiotherapy using a laser proton accelerator

Abstract

Laser acceleration promises innovation in particle beam therapy of cancer where an ultra-compact accelerator system for cancer beam therapy can become affordable to a broad range of patients. This is not feasible without the introduction of a technology that is radically different from the conventional accelerator-based approach. Because of its compactness and other novel characteristics, the laser acceleration method provides many enhanced capabilities.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [2]; ;  [3];  [3];  [2];  [1]; ; ; ; ; ;  [4];  [2]
  1. Department of Radiology, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, 1-2-1, Kouto, Tatsuno, Hyogo 679-5165 (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
  3. CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)
  4. Photo-Medical Reseach Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21148858
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1024; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 1. international symposium on laser-driven relativistic plasmas applied for science, industry and medicine, Kyoto (Japan), 17-20 Sep 2007; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2958203; (c) 2008 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ABLATION; ACCELERATION; ACCELERATORS; BEAM PRODUCTION; BEAM-PLASMA SYSTEMS; IONS; LASERS; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PROTON BEAMS; PROTONS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Murakami, Masao, Hishikawa, Yoshio, Division of Medical Imaging and Ion Beam Therapy, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1, Kusunokicho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017, CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Miyajima, Satoshi, Okazaki, Yoshiko, Sutherland, Kenneth L., School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, North 15, West 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638, Abe, Mitsuyuki, Bulanov, Sergei V., Daido, Hiroyuki, Esirkepov, Timur Zh., Koga, James, Yamagiwa, Mitsuru, Tajima, Toshiki, and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012. Radiotherapy using a laser proton accelerator. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2958203.
Murakami, Masao, Hishikawa, Yoshio, Division of Medical Imaging and Ion Beam Therapy, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1, Kusunokicho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017, CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Miyajima, Satoshi, Okazaki, Yoshiko, Sutherland, Kenneth L., School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, North 15, West 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638, Abe, Mitsuyuki, Bulanov, Sergei V., Daido, Hiroyuki, Esirkepov, Timur Zh., Koga, James, Yamagiwa, Mitsuru, Tajima, Toshiki, & CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012. Radiotherapy using a laser proton accelerator. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2958203.
Murakami, Masao, Hishikawa, Yoshio, Division of Medical Imaging and Ion Beam Therapy, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1, Kusunokicho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017, CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Miyajima, Satoshi, Okazaki, Yoshiko, Sutherland, Kenneth L., School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, North 15, West 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638, Abe, Mitsuyuki, Bulanov, Sergei V., Daido, Hiroyuki, Esirkepov, Timur Zh., Koga, James, Yamagiwa, Mitsuru, Tajima, Toshiki, and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012. Tue . "Radiotherapy using a laser proton accelerator". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2958203.
@article{osti_21148858,
title = {Radiotherapy using a laser proton accelerator},
author = {Murakami, Masao and Hishikawa, Yoshio and Division of Medical Imaging and Ion Beam Therapy, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1, Kusunokicho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 and Miyajima, Satoshi and Okazaki, Yoshiko and Sutherland, Kenneth L. and School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, North 15, West 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 and Abe, Mitsuyuki and Bulanov, Sergei V. and Daido, Hiroyuki and Esirkepov, Timur Zh. and Koga, James and Yamagiwa, Mitsuru and Tajima, Toshiki and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012},
abstractNote = {Laser acceleration promises innovation in particle beam therapy of cancer where an ultra-compact accelerator system for cancer beam therapy can become affordable to a broad range of patients. This is not feasible without the introduction of a technology that is radically different from the conventional accelerator-based approach. Because of its compactness and other novel characteristics, the laser acceleration method provides many enhanced capabilities.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2958203},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1024,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jun 24 00:00:00 EDT 2008},
month = {Tue Jun 24 00:00:00 EDT 2008}
}
  • The injection of laser-generated protons through conventional drift tube linear accelerators (linacs) has been studied numerically. For this, we used the parameters of the proton source produced by ultraintense lasers, i.e., with an intrinsic high beam quality. The numerical particle tracing code PARMELA[L. M. Young and J. H. Billen, LANL Report No. LA-UR-96-1835, 2004] is then used to inject experimentally measured laser-generated protons with energies of 7{+-}0.1 MeV and rms un-normalized emittance of 0.180 mm mrad into one drift tube linac tank that accelerated them to more than 14 MeV. The simulations exhibit un-normalized emittance growths of 8 in xmore » direction and 22.6 in y direction, with final emittances lower than those produced using conventional sources, allowing a potential luminosity gain for the final beam. However, the simulations also exhibit a limitation in the allowed injected proton charge as, over 0.112 mA, space charge effect worsens significantly the beam emittance.« less
  • Purpose: Sparing the hippocampus during cranial irradiation poses important technical challenges with respect to contouring and treatment planning. Herein we report our preliminary experience with whole-brain radiotherapy using hippocampal sparing for patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Five anonymous patients previously treated with whole-brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing were reviewed. The hippocampus was contoured, and hippocampal avoidance regions were created using a 5-mm volumetric expansion around the hippocampus. Helical tomotherapy and linear accelerator (LINAC)-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plans were generated for a prescription dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Results: On average, the hippocampal avoidance volume wasmore » 3.3 cm{sup 3}, occupying 2.1% of the whole-brain planned target volume. Helical tomotherapy spared the hippocampus, with a median dose of 5.5 Gy and maximum dose of 12.8 Gy. LINAC-based IMRT spared the hippocampus, with a median dose of 7.8 Gy and maximum dose of 15.3 Gy. On a per-fraction basis, mean dose to the hippocampus (normalized to 2-Gy fractions) was reduced by 87% to 0.49 Gy{sub 2} using helical tomotherapy and by 81% to 0.73 Gy{sub 2} using LINAC-based IMRT. Target coverage and homogeneity was acceptable with both IMRT modalities, with differences largely attributed to more rapid dose fall-off with helical tomotherapy. Conclusion: Modern IMRT techniques allow for sparing of the hippocampus with acceptable target coverage and homogeneity. Based on compelling preclinical evidence, a Phase II cooperative group trial has been developed to test the postulated neurocognitive benefit.« less
  • Purpose: A physician's decision regarding an ideal treatment approach (i.e., radiation, surgery, and/or hormonal) for prostate carcinoma is traditionally based on a variety of metrics. One of these metrics is the risk of radiation-induced second primary cancer following radiation treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the significance of second cancer risks in out-of-field organs from 3D-CRT and IMRT treatments of prostate carcinoma compared to baseline cancer risks in these organs. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were performed using a detailed medical linear accelerator model and an anatomically realistic adult male whole-body phantom. A four-field box treatment, a four-fieldmore » box treatment plus a six-field boost, and a seven-field IMRT treatment were simulated. Using BEIR VII risk models, the age-dependent lifetime attributable risks to various organs outside the primary beam with a known predilection for cancer were calculated using organ-averaged equivalent doses. Results: The four-field box treatment had the lowest treatment-related second primary cancer risks to organs outside the primary beam ranging from 7.3x10{sup -9} to 2.54x10{sup -5}%/MU depending on the patients age at exposure and second primary cancer site. The risks to organs outside the primary beam from the four-field box and six-field boost and the seven-field IMRT were nearly equivalent. The risks from the four-field box and six-field boost ranged from 1.39x10{sup -8} to 1.80x10{sup -5}%/MU, and from the seven-field IMRT ranged from 1.60x10{sup -9} to 1.35x10{sup -5}%/MU. The second cancer risks in all organs considered from each plan were below the baseline risks. Conclusions: The treatment-related second cancer risks in organs outside the primary beam due to 3D-CRT and IMRT is small. New risk assessment techniques need to be investigated to address the concern of radiation-induced second cancers from prostate treatments, particularly focusing on risks to organs inside the primary beam.« less
  • No abstract prepared.