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Title: Concrete Waste Recycling Process for High Quality Aggregate

Abstract

Large amount of concrete waste generates during nuclear power plant (NPP) dismantling. Non-contaminated concrete waste is assumed to be disposed in a landfill site, but that will not be the solution especially in the future, because of decreasing tendency of the site availability and natural resources. Concerning concrete recycling, demand for roadbeds and backfill tends to be less than the amount of dismantled concrete generated in a single rural site, and conventional recycled aggregate is limited of its use to non-structural concrete, because of its inferior quality to ordinary natural aggregate. Therefore, it is vital to develop high quality recycled aggregate for general uses of dismantled concrete. If recycled aggregate is available for high structural concrete, the dismantling concrete is recyclable as aggregate for industry including nuclear field. Authors developed techniques on high quality aggregate reclamation for large amount of concrete generated during NPP decommissioning. Concrete of NPP buildings has good features for recycling aggregate; large quantity of high quality aggregate from same origin, record keeping of the aggregate origin, and little impurities in dismantled concrete such as wood and plastics. The target of recycled aggregate in this development is to meet the quality criteria for NPP concrete as prescribedmore » in JASS 5N 'Specification for Nuclear Power Facility Reinforced Concrete' and JASS 5 'Specification for Reinforced Concrete Work'. The target of recycled aggregate concrete is to be comparable performance with ordinary aggregate concrete. The high quality recycled aggregate production techniques are assumed to apply for recycling for large amount of non-contaminated concrete. These techniques can also be applied for slightly contaminated concrete dismantled from radiological control area (RCA), together with free release survey. In conclusion: a technology on dismantled concrete recycling for high quality aggregate was developed. Various tests and evaluation confirmed that the high quality recycled aggregate concrete is almost equal strength and durability to ordinary aggregate concrete. The developed techniques of high quality recycled aggregate production have been applied to several new reinforced concrete buildings in industry since 2002. A practical recycling process for slightly contaminated concrete that consists of high quality recycled aggregate production and radiological survey was proposed.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC): Nishi-shimbashi Yasuda Union Bldg., 2-4-2, Nishi-shimbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
American Nuclear Society, 555 North Kensington Avenue, La Grange Park, Illinois 60526 (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
21144165
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: DD and R 2007: ANS Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination, and Reutilization 2007, Chattanooga, TN (United States), 16-19 Sep 2007; Other Information: Country of input: France; 2 refs; Related Information: In: Proceedings of the 2007 ANS Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination, and Reutilization - DD and R 2007, 336 pages.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; DECOMMISSIONING; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; RECYCLING; REINFORCED CONCRETE; SPECIFICATIONS

Citation Formats

Ishikura, Takeshi, and Fujii, Shin-ichi. Concrete Waste Recycling Process for High Quality Aggregate. United States: N. p., 2008. Web.
Ishikura, Takeshi, & Fujii, Shin-ichi. Concrete Waste Recycling Process for High Quality Aggregate. United States.
Ishikura, Takeshi, and Fujii, Shin-ichi. 2008. "Concrete Waste Recycling Process for High Quality Aggregate". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_21144165,
title = {Concrete Waste Recycling Process for High Quality Aggregate},
author = {Ishikura, Takeshi and Fujii, Shin-ichi},
abstractNote = {Large amount of concrete waste generates during nuclear power plant (NPP) dismantling. Non-contaminated concrete waste is assumed to be disposed in a landfill site, but that will not be the solution especially in the future, because of decreasing tendency of the site availability and natural resources. Concerning concrete recycling, demand for roadbeds and backfill tends to be less than the amount of dismantled concrete generated in a single rural site, and conventional recycled aggregate is limited of its use to non-structural concrete, because of its inferior quality to ordinary natural aggregate. Therefore, it is vital to develop high quality recycled aggregate for general uses of dismantled concrete. If recycled aggregate is available for high structural concrete, the dismantling concrete is recyclable as aggregate for industry including nuclear field. Authors developed techniques on high quality aggregate reclamation for large amount of concrete generated during NPP decommissioning. Concrete of NPP buildings has good features for recycling aggregate; large quantity of high quality aggregate from same origin, record keeping of the aggregate origin, and little impurities in dismantled concrete such as wood and plastics. The target of recycled aggregate in this development is to meet the quality criteria for NPP concrete as prescribed in JASS 5N 'Specification for Nuclear Power Facility Reinforced Concrete' and JASS 5 'Specification for Reinforced Concrete Work'. The target of recycled aggregate concrete is to be comparable performance with ordinary aggregate concrete. The high quality recycled aggregate production techniques are assumed to apply for recycling for large amount of non-contaminated concrete. These techniques can also be applied for slightly contaminated concrete dismantled from radiological control area (RCA), together with free release survey. In conclusion: a technology on dismantled concrete recycling for high quality aggregate was developed. Various tests and evaluation confirmed that the high quality recycled aggregate concrete is almost equal strength and durability to ordinary aggregate concrete. The developed techniques of high quality recycled aggregate production have been applied to several new reinforced concrete buildings in industry since 2002. A practical recycling process for slightly contaminated concrete that consists of high quality recycled aggregate production and radiological survey was proposed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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  • The possible deleterious effects of higher contents in tramp elements on steel properties must be well defined in order to keep them within acceptable limits. No industrial technique is presently available to remove tramp elements from steel melts. Only a strict control on the metallic input and on the scrap composition is feasible. In this matter, scrap preparation which aims at a better separation between iron and other nonferrous components, is getting more attention. A large multinational project has been initiated in Europe under the sponsorship of ECSC and of the Steel Industry to better identify the effects of residualsmore » on steel properties and to examine potential techniques able to control tramp elements during steelmaking operations. The project has been supported and orientated by a preliminary study, reviewing the relevant published data on the tramp element influence for long and flat products. The present report is devoted to overview available information on the effects of tramp elements and to describe the targets and the content of the European megaproject on scrap recycling.« less
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