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Title: Taip2 is a novel cell death-related gene expressed in the brain during development

Abstract

TAIP2 was isolated as one of the homologous genes of TAIP3 (TGF-{beta}-up-regulated apoptosis-inducing-protein chromosome 3). The transcript of the mouse counterpart of TAIP2, designated mTaip2, was detected in several tissue specimens from embryos to adults, while mTaip2 was dominantly expressed in the embryonic brain. The overexpression of the full-length mTaip2 induced cell death in various cell lines. An analysis of mTaip2 deletion mutants revealed that the N-terminal half of mTaip2, but not the C-terminal half, had nuclear localization and cell death-inducing activities. The results indicate that mTaip2 is a novel cell death-related gene dominantly expressed in the embryonic brain, thus suggesting that mTaip2 may play a role in development of the brain.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [2];  [4];  [5]
  1. Immuno-biological Laboratories Co., Ltd., 440-22 Okayama, Mikasa-shi, Hokkaido (Japan)
  2. Department of Molecular Immunology, DNA Institute of Medicine, Tokyo Jikei University School of Medicine, 3-25-8 Nishi-Shinbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8461 (Japan)
  3. Department of Science for Laboratory Animal Experimentation, Research Institute for Microbial Disease, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)
  4. Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)
  5. Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan), E-mail: skondoh@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21143644
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 369; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2008.02.041; PII: S0006-291X(08)00292-1; Copyright (c) 2008 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; APOPTOSIS; BRAIN; CHROMOSOMES; EMBRYOS; GENES; MICE; MUTANTS; TRANSCRIPTION

Citation Formats

Yamada, Kazumi, Akiyama, Nobutake, Yamada, Shuichi, Tanaka, Hiromitsu, Saito, Saburo, Hiraoka, Masahiro, and Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae. Taip2 is a novel cell death-related gene expressed in the brain during development. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2008.02.041.
Yamada, Kazumi, Akiyama, Nobutake, Yamada, Shuichi, Tanaka, Hiromitsu, Saito, Saburo, Hiraoka, Masahiro, & Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae. Taip2 is a novel cell death-related gene expressed in the brain during development. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2008.02.041.
Yamada, Kazumi, Akiyama, Nobutake, Yamada, Shuichi, Tanaka, Hiromitsu, Saito, Saburo, Hiraoka, Masahiro, and Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae. Fri . "Taip2 is a novel cell death-related gene expressed in the brain during development". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2008.02.041.
@article{osti_21143644,
title = {Taip2 is a novel cell death-related gene expressed in the brain during development},
author = {Yamada, Kazumi and Akiyama, Nobutake and Yamada, Shuichi and Tanaka, Hiromitsu and Saito, Saburo and Hiraoka, Masahiro and Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae},
abstractNote = {TAIP2 was isolated as one of the homologous genes of TAIP3 (TGF-{beta}-up-regulated apoptosis-inducing-protein chromosome 3). The transcript of the mouse counterpart of TAIP2, designated mTaip2, was detected in several tissue specimens from embryos to adults, while mTaip2 was dominantly expressed in the embryonic brain. The overexpression of the full-length mTaip2 induced cell death in various cell lines. An analysis of mTaip2 deletion mutants revealed that the N-terminal half of mTaip2, but not the C-terminal half, had nuclear localization and cell death-inducing activities. The results indicate that mTaip2 is a novel cell death-related gene dominantly expressed in the embryonic brain, thus suggesting that mTaip2 may play a role in development of the brain.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbrc.2008.02.041},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 2,
volume = 369,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri May 02 00:00:00 EDT 2008},
month = {Fri May 02 00:00:00 EDT 2008}
}
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