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Title: Beamed Energy Propulsion: Research Status And Needs--Part 2

Abstract

One promising solution to the operationally responsive space is the application of remote electromagnetic energy to propel a launch vehicle into orbit. With beamed energy propulsion, one can leave the power source stationary on the ground or space, and direct heat propellant on the spacecraft with a beam from a fixed station. This permits the spacecraft to leave its power source at home, saving significant amounts of mass, greatly improving performance. This concept, which removes the mass penalty of carrying the propulsion energy source on board the vehicle, was first proposed by Arthur Kantrowitz in 1972; he invoked an extremely powerful ground based laser. The same year Michael Minovich suggested a conceptually similar 'in-space' laser rocket system utilizing a remote laser power station. In the late 1980's, Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) funded continuous, double pulse laser and microwave propulsion while Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) funded ablative laser rocket propulsion. Currently AFOSR has been funding the concept initiated by Leik Myrabo, repetitively pulsed laser propulsion, which has been universally perceived, arguably, to be the closest for mid-term applications. This 2-part paper examines the investment strategies in beamed energy propulsion and technical challenges to be covers Part 2more » covers the present research status and needs.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Arlington, Virginia, 22203 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21137102
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
AIP Conference Proceedings
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 997; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 5. international symposium on beamed energy propulsion, Kailua-Kona, HI (United States), 12-15 Nov 2007; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2931889; (c) 2008 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0094-243X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; AIR; BALLISTIC MISSILE DEFENSE; ENERGY SOURCES; LASER RADIATION; LASERS; MICROWAVE RADIATION; PLASMA; PLASMA PRODUCTION; PROPULSION; PULSES; ROCKETS; SPACE

Citation Formats

Birkan, Mitat. Beamed Energy Propulsion: Research Status And Needs--Part 2. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2931889.
Birkan, Mitat. Beamed Energy Propulsion: Research Status And Needs--Part 2. United States. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2931889
Birkan, Mitat. Mon . "Beamed Energy Propulsion: Research Status And Needs--Part 2". United States. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2931889.
@article{osti_21137102,
title = {Beamed Energy Propulsion: Research Status And Needs--Part 2},
author = {Birkan, Mitat},
abstractNote = {One promising solution to the operationally responsive space is the application of remote electromagnetic energy to propel a launch vehicle into orbit. With beamed energy propulsion, one can leave the power source stationary on the ground or space, and direct heat propellant on the spacecraft with a beam from a fixed station. This permits the spacecraft to leave its power source at home, saving significant amounts of mass, greatly improving performance. This concept, which removes the mass penalty of carrying the propulsion energy source on board the vehicle, was first proposed by Arthur Kantrowitz in 1972; he invoked an extremely powerful ground based laser. The same year Michael Minovich suggested a conceptually similar 'in-space' laser rocket system utilizing a remote laser power station. In the late 1980's, Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) funded continuous, double pulse laser and microwave propulsion while Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) funded ablative laser rocket propulsion. Currently AFOSR has been funding the concept initiated by Leik Myrabo, repetitively pulsed laser propulsion, which has been universally perceived, arguably, to be the closest for mid-term applications. This 2-part paper examines the investment strategies in beamed energy propulsion and technical challenges to be covers Part 2 covers the present research status and needs.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2931889},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/21137102}, journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
issn = {0094-243X},
number = 1,
volume = 997,
place = {United States},
year = {2008},
month = {4}
}