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Title: Treatment Planning and Delivery of External Beam Radiotherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma: The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Experience

Abstract

Purpose: To describe and review the radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning and delivery techniques used for pediatric sarcoma patients at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. The treatment characteristics serve as a baseline for future comparison with developing treatment modalities. Patients and Methods: Since January 2003, we have prospectively treated pediatric and young-adult patients with soft-tissue and bone sarcomas on an institutional Phase II protocol evaluating local control and RT-related treatment effects from external-beam RT (conformal or intensity-modulated RT; 83.4%), low-dose-rate brachytherapy (8.3%), or both (8.3%). Here we describe the treatment dosimetry and delivery parameters of the initial 72 patients (median, 11.6 years; range, 1.4-21.6 years). Results: Cumulative doses from all RT modalities ranged from 41.4 to 70.2 Gy (median, 50.4 Gy). Median D{sub 95} and V{sub 95} of the planning target volume of external-beam RT plans were, respectively, 93.4% of the prescribed dose and 94.6% of the target volume for the primary phase and 97.8% and 99.2% for the cone-down/boost phase. The dose-volume histogram statistics for 27 critical organs varied greatly. The spinal cord in 13 of 36 patients received dose >45 Gy (up to 52 Gy in 1 cc) because of tumor proximity. Conclusions: Planning and delivery of complex multifieldmore » external beam RT is feasible in pediatric patients with sarcomas. Improvements on conformity and dose gradients are still desired in many cases with sensitive adjacent critical structures. Long-term follow-up will determine the risk of local failure and the benefit of normal tissue avoidance for this population.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ; ; ;  [2]
  1. Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States), E-mail: Chia-Ho.Hua@stjude.org
  2. Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21124172
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 70; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2007.12.013; PII: S0360-3016(07)04705-0; Copyright (c) 2008 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BRACHYTHERAPY; CHILDREN; CRITICAL ORGANS; DOSE RATES; HOSPITALS; PATIENTS; PEDIATRICS; PLANNING; SARCOMAS; SKELETON; SPINAL CORD

Citation Formats

Hua Chiaho, Gray, Jonathan M., Merchant, Thomas E., Kun, Larry E., and Krasin, Matthew J.. Treatment Planning and Delivery of External Beam Radiotherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma: The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Experience. United States: N. p., 2008. Web.
Hua Chiaho, Gray, Jonathan M., Merchant, Thomas E., Kun, Larry E., & Krasin, Matthew J.. Treatment Planning and Delivery of External Beam Radiotherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma: The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Experience. United States.
Hua Chiaho, Gray, Jonathan M., Merchant, Thomas E., Kun, Larry E., and Krasin, Matthew J.. Tue . "Treatment Planning and Delivery of External Beam Radiotherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma: The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Experience". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_21124172,
title = {Treatment Planning and Delivery of External Beam Radiotherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma: The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Experience},
author = {Hua Chiaho and Gray, Jonathan M. and Merchant, Thomas E. and Kun, Larry E. and Krasin, Matthew J.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To describe and review the radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning and delivery techniques used for pediatric sarcoma patients at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. The treatment characteristics serve as a baseline for future comparison with developing treatment modalities. Patients and Methods: Since January 2003, we have prospectively treated pediatric and young-adult patients with soft-tissue and bone sarcomas on an institutional Phase II protocol evaluating local control and RT-related treatment effects from external-beam RT (conformal or intensity-modulated RT; 83.4%), low-dose-rate brachytherapy (8.3%), or both (8.3%). Here we describe the treatment dosimetry and delivery parameters of the initial 72 patients (median, 11.6 years; range, 1.4-21.6 years). Results: Cumulative doses from all RT modalities ranged from 41.4 to 70.2 Gy (median, 50.4 Gy). Median D{sub 95} and V{sub 95} of the planning target volume of external-beam RT plans were, respectively, 93.4% of the prescribed dose and 94.6% of the target volume for the primary phase and 97.8% and 99.2% for the cone-down/boost phase. The dose-volume histogram statistics for 27 critical organs varied greatly. The spinal cord in 13 of 36 patients received dose >45 Gy (up to 52 Gy in 1 cc) because of tumor proximity. Conclusions: Planning and delivery of complex multifield external beam RT is feasible in pediatric patients with sarcomas. Improvements on conformity and dose gradients are still desired in many cases with sensitive adjacent critical structures. Long-term follow-up will determine the risk of local failure and the benefit of normal tissue avoidance for this population.},
doi = {},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 70,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2008},
month = {Tue Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2008}
}
  • Purpose: To determine the incidence of anesthesia-related complications in children undergoing radiotherapy and the associated risk factors. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively investigated the incidence and types of anesthesia-related complications and examined their association with age, weight, oncology diagnosis, type of anesthetic (propofol vs. propofol and adjuncts), total propofol dose, anesthetic duration, type of radiotherapy procedure (simulation vs. radiotherapy) and patient position (prone vs. supine). Results: Between July 2004 and June 2006, propofol was used in 3,833 procedures (3,611 radiotherapy sessions and 222 simulations) in 177 patients. Complications occurred during 49 anesthetic sessions (1.3%). On univariate analysis, four factors weremore » significantly associated with the risk of complications: procedure duration (p <0.001), total propofol dose (p <0.001), use of adjunct agents (vs. propofol alone; p = 0.029), and simulation (vs. radiotherapy; p = 0.014). Patient position (prone vs. supine) was not significantly associated with the frequency of complications (odds ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-1.53; p = 0.38). On multivariate analysis, the procedure duration (p <0.0001) and total propofol dose (p {<=}0.03) were the most significant risk factors after adjustment for age, weight, anesthetic type, and procedure type. We found no evidence of the development of tolerance to propofol. Conclusion: The rate of anesthesia-related complications was low (1.3%) in our study. The significant risk factors were procedure duration, total propofol dose, the use of adjunct agents with propofol, and simulation (vs. radiotherapy)« less
  • Purpose: To develop treatment planning workflow for rapid radiotherapy delivered with very-high energy electron (VHEE) scanning beam. Methods: VHEE radiotherapy treatment planning was performed by linking Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations with inverse optimization in a research version of RayStation. In order to study a number of treatment parameters, a Matlab graphical user interface (GUI) for calculation of VHEE beamlet dose was developed. Through the GUI, EGSnrc MC simulations were run for a number of beam energies, number of beams, beamlet spot and grid sizes, and machine bore sizes. VHEE plans for a pediatric patient with a 4.3 cm{sup 3}more » brain target optimized with spot-scanning algorithm in RayStation were compared to the clinically delivered 6 MV VMAT plan. Results and Discussion: VHEE beam energy had the largest effect on the quality of dose distributions. For the same target dose, the mean doses to critical organs decreased by 10–15% when planned with 100 MeV compared to 60 MeV. VHEE plans calculated with 36 beams outperformed plans calculated with 13 and 17 beams. While beamlet spacing and bore size had a small effect on VHEE dose distributions, 0.1-3mm beamlet sizes resulted in identical dose distributions. Critical organ doses were by up to 70% lower in the best VHEE plan compared to the clinical 6 MV VMAT plan. Conclusions: We have developed a GUI for MC beamlet generation for treatment planning of VHEE radiotherapy. We have demonstrated that pediatric VHEE plans resulted in significant critical organ dose sparing compared to the clinical VMAT plan.« less
  • Purpose: To analyze long-term prognosis and morbidity after limb-sparing treatment of patients with extremity soft-tissue sarcoma, with intraoperative electron boost radiotherapy (IOERT) followed by a moderate dose of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 153 patients who were treated in a single center from 1991 to 2004 were evaluated. Median IOERT dose was 15 Gy, mean EBRT dose 43 Gy (range, 40-50.4 Gy) in conventional fractionation (1.8-2 Gy). Median duration of follow-up was 33 months. Acute toxicity was assessed with Common Toxicity Criteria; late toxic effects were scored according to European Organization for Research and Treatmentmore » of Cancer/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: Five-year overall survival and 5-year local control rates were 77% and 78%, respectively. Whereas tumor size, patient age, and EBRT dose did not significantly affect outcome, resection status and grading were significant for survival; resection status and IOERT dose were significant for local control. Extremity salvage until death or time of follow-up was achieved in 90% of our patients, 86% of whom showed excellent limb function without impairment in activities of daily life. Acute toxicity Grade 2-4 was observed in 23% and late toxicity Grade 2-4 in 17% of patients. Conclusions: Treatment with IOERT combined with moderate doses of external beam irradiation yields high local control and extremity preservation rates in resected extremity soft-tissue sarcoma.« less
  • Purpose: The goal of this study was to determine the effect of combination of intratumoral administration of dendritic cells (DC) and fractionated external beam radiation (EBRT) on tumor-specific immune responses in patients with soft-tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Material: Seventeen patients with large (>5 cm) high-grade STS were enrolled in the study. They were treated in the neoadjuvant setting with 5,040 cGy of EBRT, split into 28 fractions and delivered 5 days per week, combined with intratumoral injection of 10{sup 7} DCs followed by complete resection. DCs were injected on the second, third, and fourth Friday of the treatment cycle.more » Clinical evaluation and immunological assessments were performed. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. No patient had tumor-specific immune responses before combined EBRT/DC therapy; 9 patients (52.9%) developed tumor-specific immune responses, which lasted from 11 to 42 weeks. Twelve of 17 patients (70.6%) were progression free after 1 year. Treatment caused a dramatic accumulation of T cells in the tumor. The presence of CD4{sup +} T cells in the tumor positively correlated with tumor-specific immune responses that developed following combined therapy. Accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells but not regulatory T cells negatively correlated with the development of tumor-specific immune responses. Experiments with {sup 111}In labeled DCs demonstrated that these antigen presenting cells need at least 48 h to start migrating from tumor site. Conclusions: Combination of intratumoral DC administration with EBRT was safe and resulted in induction of antitumor immune responses. This suggests that this therapy is promising and needs further testing in clinical trials design to assess clinical efficacy.« less
  • Purpose: Investigating the impact of tumor regression on the dose within cervical tumors and surrounding organs, comparing conventional, conformal, and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and the need for repeated treatment planning during irradiation. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with cervical cancer underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging before treatment and once during treatment, after about 30 Gy. Target volumes and critical organs were delineated. First conventional, conformal, and IMRT plans were generated. To evaluate the impact of tumor regression, we calculated dose-volume histograms for these plans, using the delineations of the intratreatment MR images. Second conformal and IMRT plans were made basedmore » on the delineations of the intratreatment MR images. First and second plans were compared. Results: The average volume receiving 95% of the prescribed dose (43 Gy) by the conventional, conformal, and IMRT plans was, respectively, for the bowel 626 cc, 427 cc, and 232 cc; for the rectum 101 cc, 90 cc, and 60 cc; and for the bladder 89 cc, 70 cc, and 58 cc. The volumes of critical organs at this dose level were significantly reduced using IMRT compared with conventional and conformal planning (p < 0.02 in all cases). After having delivered about 30 Gy external beam radiation therapy, the primary gross tumor volumes decreased on average by 46% (range, 6.1-100%). The target volumes on the intratreatment MR images remained sufficiently covered by the 95% isodose. Second IMRT plans significantly diminished the treated bowel volume, if the primary gross tumor volumes decreased >30 cc. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is superior in sparing of critical organs compared with conventional and conformal treatment, with adequate coverage of the target volumes. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy remains superior after 30 Gy external beam radiation therapy, despite tumor regression and internal organ motion. Repeated IMRT planning can improve the sparing of the bowel and rectum in patients with substantial tumor regression.« less