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Title: How to Test Atom and Neutron Neutrality with Atom Interferometry

Abstract

We propose an atom-interferometry experiment based on the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect which detects an atom charge at the 10{sup -28}e level, and improves the current laboratory limits by 8 orders of magnitude. This setup independently probes neutron charges down to 10{sup -28}e, 7 orders of magnitude below current bounds.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21123774
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 100; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.120407; (c) 2008 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; AHARONOV-BOHM EFFECT; ATOMS; INTERFEROMETRY; NEUTRAL PARTICLES; NEUTRONS

Citation Formats

Arvanitaki, Asimina, Theory Group, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, California 94025, Dimopoulos, Savas, Geraci, Andrew A., Hogan, Jason, and Kasevich, Mark. How to Test Atom and Neutron Neutrality with Atom Interferometry. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.100.120407.
Arvanitaki, Asimina, Theory Group, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, California 94025, Dimopoulos, Savas, Geraci, Andrew A., Hogan, Jason, & Kasevich, Mark. How to Test Atom and Neutron Neutrality with Atom Interferometry. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.100.120407.
Arvanitaki, Asimina, Theory Group, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, California 94025, Dimopoulos, Savas, Geraci, Andrew A., Hogan, Jason, and Kasevich, Mark. 2008. "How to Test Atom and Neutron Neutrality with Atom Interferometry". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.100.120407.
@article{osti_21123774,
title = {How to Test Atom and Neutron Neutrality with Atom Interferometry},
author = {Arvanitaki, Asimina and Theory Group, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, California 94025 and Dimopoulos, Savas and Geraci, Andrew A. and Hogan, Jason and Kasevich, Mark},
abstractNote = {We propose an atom-interferometry experiment based on the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect which detects an atom charge at the 10{sup -28}e level, and improves the current laboratory limits by 8 orders of magnitude. This setup independently probes neutron charges down to 10{sup -28}e, 7 orders of magnitude below current bounds.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.100.120407},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 12,
volume = 100,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month = 3
}
  • We propose an atom-interferometry experiment based on the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect which detects an atom charge at the 10{sup -28} e level, and improves the current laboratory limits by 8 orders of magnitude. This setup independently probes neutron charges down to 10{sup 28} e, 7 orders of magnitude below current bounds.
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