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Title: Surface microwave discharges in air

Abstract

A microwave discharge excited on the outer surface of a dielectric antenna has been investigated. The transverse and longitudinal dimensions and propagation velocities of the discharge have been measured as functions of the air pressure and the power and duration of the exciting microwave pulse. The spatial distributions and time evolution of the gas temperature, electron density, and radiation intensity of the discharge have been determined. It is shown that the degree of ionization of the discharge plasma can exceed 10%. The spatial distribution of the electron density is found to depend strongly on the air pressure.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Moscow State University (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21100211
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Plasma Physics Reports; Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1134/S1063780X07010096; Copyright (c) 2007 Nauka/Interperiodica; Article Copyright (c) 2007 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; AIR; ANTENNAS; DIELECTRIC MATERIALS; ELECTRON DENSITY; ELECTRON TEMPERATURE; HIGH-FREQUENCY DISCHARGES; IONIZATION; MICROWAVE RADIATION; PLASMA; PULSES; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; SURFACES

Citation Formats

Shibkov, V. M., Dvinin, S. A., Ershov, A. P., Konstantinovskii, R. S., Surkont, O. S., Chernikov, V. A., and Shibkova, L. V. Surface microwave discharges in air. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1134/S1063780X07010096.
Shibkov, V. M., Dvinin, S. A., Ershov, A. P., Konstantinovskii, R. S., Surkont, O. S., Chernikov, V. A., & Shibkova, L. V. Surface microwave discharges in air. United States. doi:10.1134/S1063780X07010096.
Shibkov, V. M., Dvinin, S. A., Ershov, A. P., Konstantinovskii, R. S., Surkont, O. S., Chernikov, V. A., and Shibkova, L. V. Mon . "Surface microwave discharges in air". United States. doi:10.1134/S1063780X07010096.
@article{osti_21100211,
title = {Surface microwave discharges in air},
author = {Shibkov, V. M. and Dvinin, S. A. and Ershov, A. P. and Konstantinovskii, R. S. and Surkont, O. S. and Chernikov, V. A. and Shibkova, L. V.},
abstractNote = {A microwave discharge excited on the outer surface of a dielectric antenna has been investigated. The transverse and longitudinal dimensions and propagation velocities of the discharge have been measured as functions of the air pressure and the power and duration of the exciting microwave pulse. The spatial distributions and time evolution of the gas temperature, electron density, and radiation intensity of the discharge have been determined. It is shown that the degree of ionization of the discharge plasma can exceed 10%. The spatial distribution of the electron density is found to depend strongly on the air pressure.},
doi = {10.1134/S1063780X07010096},
journal = {Plasma Physics Reports},
number = 1,
volume = 33,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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