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Title: Biliary Complications in Living Donor Liver Transplantation: Imaging Findings and the Roles of Interventional Procedures

Abstract

Purpose. To describe the incidence, types, and findings of biliary complications in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and to determine the roles of interventional procedures. Materials and methods. Twenty-four biliary complications among 161 LDLT patients (24/161, 14.9%) were identified. These complications were divided into two groups according to the initial manifestation time, i.e., 'early' (<60 days) or 'late'. The CT and cholangiographic findings were reviewed regarding the presence of a stricture or leak and the location, and length, shape, and degree of the stricture. Both groups were categorized into three subgroups: leak, stricture, and both. The type of interventional procedures used and their roles were determined. Results. Early complications were identified in 14 of the 24 patients (58%) and late complications in 11 (46%). One patient showed both early and late complications. Biliary stricture was detected in 10 patients, leak in 10, and both in 5. By cholangiography, all strictures were irregular and short (mean length 15 {+-} 6 mm) at the anastomotic site and complete obstruction was observed in 2 patients with late stricture. Twenty-three of the 24 patients were treated using percutaneous and/or endoscopic drainage procedures with or without balloon dilatation. Seventeen (74%) showed a good response, butmore » reoperations were inevitable in 6 (26%). All patients except those with complete obstruction showed a favorable outcome after interventional management. Conclusion. Biliary leaks and strictures are predominant complications in LDLT. Most show good responses to interventional treatment. However, complete obstruction needs additional operative management.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21091322
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 28; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: DOI: 10.1007/s00270-004-0262-7; Copyright (c) 2005 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.; www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BILIARY TRACT; DRAINAGE; IMAGE PROCESSING; IMAGES; LEAKS; LIVER; PATIENTS

Citation Formats

Chang, Jung Min, Lee, Jeong Min, Suh, Kyung Suk, Yi, Nam Joon, Kim, Yong Tae, Kim, Se Hyung, Han, Joon Koo, E-mail: hanjk@radcom.snu.ac.kr, and Choi, Byung Ihn. Biliary Complications in Living Donor Liver Transplantation: Imaging Findings and the Roles of Interventional Procedures. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-004-0262-7.
Chang, Jung Min, Lee, Jeong Min, Suh, Kyung Suk, Yi, Nam Joon, Kim, Yong Tae, Kim, Se Hyung, Han, Joon Koo, E-mail: hanjk@radcom.snu.ac.kr, & Choi, Byung Ihn. Biliary Complications in Living Donor Liver Transplantation: Imaging Findings and the Roles of Interventional Procedures. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-004-0262-7.
Chang, Jung Min, Lee, Jeong Min, Suh, Kyung Suk, Yi, Nam Joon, Kim, Yong Tae, Kim, Se Hyung, Han, Joon Koo, E-mail: hanjk@radcom.snu.ac.kr, and Choi, Byung Ihn. Thu . "Biliary Complications in Living Donor Liver Transplantation: Imaging Findings and the Roles of Interventional Procedures". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-004-0262-7.
@article{osti_21091322,
title = {Biliary Complications in Living Donor Liver Transplantation: Imaging Findings and the Roles of Interventional Procedures},
author = {Chang, Jung Min and Lee, Jeong Min and Suh, Kyung Suk and Yi, Nam Joon and Kim, Yong Tae and Kim, Se Hyung and Han, Joon Koo, E-mail: hanjk@radcom.snu.ac.kr and Choi, Byung Ihn},
abstractNote = {Purpose. To describe the incidence, types, and findings of biliary complications in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and to determine the roles of interventional procedures. Materials and methods. Twenty-four biliary complications among 161 LDLT patients (24/161, 14.9%) were identified. These complications were divided into two groups according to the initial manifestation time, i.e., 'early' (<60 days) or 'late'. The CT and cholangiographic findings were reviewed regarding the presence of a stricture or leak and the location, and length, shape, and degree of the stricture. Both groups were categorized into three subgroups: leak, stricture, and both. The type of interventional procedures used and their roles were determined. Results. Early complications were identified in 14 of the 24 patients (58%) and late complications in 11 (46%). One patient showed both early and late complications. Biliary stricture was detected in 10 patients, leak in 10, and both in 5. By cholangiography, all strictures were irregular and short (mean length 15 {+-} 6 mm) at the anastomotic site and complete obstruction was observed in 2 patients with late stricture. Twenty-three of the 24 patients were treated using percutaneous and/or endoscopic drainage procedures with or without balloon dilatation. Seventeen (74%) showed a good response, but reoperations were inevitable in 6 (26%). All patients except those with complete obstruction showed a favorable outcome after interventional management. Conclusion. Biliary leaks and strictures are predominant complications in LDLT. Most show good responses to interventional treatment. However, complete obstruction needs additional operative management.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-004-0262-7},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 6,
volume = 28,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous treatment of biliary strictures complicating orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Methods: Between October 1990 and May 2000, 619 patients underwent 678 liver transplants. Seventy of the 619 (11%) patients were found to be affected by biliary strictures by July 2000. Bilioplasty was performed in 51 of these 70 (73%) patients. A cohort of 33 of 51 (65%) patients were clinically followed for more than 12 months after the last percutaneous treatment and included in the survey results. Results: After one to three treatments 24 of 33 (73%)patients were stricture-free on ultrasound andmore » MR cholangiography follow-up. A delayed stricture recurrence required a fourth percutaneous bilioplasty in two of 33 (6%) patients. A surgical bilioenteric anastomosis was performed in six of 33 (18%) patients.Retransplantation was performed due to ischemic damage in one of 33(3%) patients. Conclusion: Interventional radiology is an effective therapeutic alternative for the treatment of most biliary strictures complicating OLT. It has a high success rate and should be considered before surgical interventions. Elective surgery may be necessary in a few failed cases or those with more severe and extensive biliary strictures.« less
  • Purpose: Biliary complications contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality in the liver transplant recipient. Surgery has been the mainstay of therapy, but interventional radiological techniques have made significant progress. Methods: Diagnostic percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) was performed in 12 patients; percutaneous transhepatic drainage (PTD) was performed in 10 patients. Additional interventional procedures included laser lithotripsy, biopsy, dilatation, and stent implantation. Results: In 6 patients PTC revealed anastomotic, and in 6 patients nonanastomotic biliary strictures. Four patients had intrahepatic stones. Biliary strictures were treated by implantation of Palmaz stents in 5 of 6 patients with anastomotic strictures, and in 3 ofmore » 6 patients with nonanastomotic strictures. The intrahepatic stones were fragmented with dye laser lithotripsy under cholangioscopic control in 3 of 4 patients. One spontaneous stent migration after 24 months and one stent occlusion were observed; the remaining stents are still patent. Patients with anastomotic strictures had a more favorable outcome: 5 of 6 of these patients are still alive and symptom-free after an average of 27.4 months, but only 3 of 6 patients with nonanastomotic strictures are alive after an average of 9.8 months. Conclusion: The different outcomes in patients with anastomotic versus nonanastomotic strictures may be explained by the different causes of these types of stricture.« less
  • Biliary reconstruction continues to be a major source of morbidity following liver transplantation. The spectrum of biliary complications is evolving due to the increasing number of split-liver and living-donor liver transplantation, which are even associated with a higher incidence of biliary complications. Bile duct strictures are the most common cause of late biliary complications and account for up to 40% of all biliary complications. Optimal therapy for posttransplantation anastomotic biliary strictures remains uncertain and requires a multidisciplinary approach. We report the case of a 54-year-old Caucasian male affected by hepatocarcinoma and hepatitis C-related cirrhosis who underwent right-lobe living-donor liver transplantationmore » from his son complicated by double anastomotic stenosis of the main right hepatic duct and of an accessory biliary duct draining segments 6 and 7 of the graft that was successfully treated by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography with long-term subcutaneous placement of two internal Ruesch-type biliary stents.« less
  • Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an established treatment for gastric varices; it has been used more rarely to treat mesenteric varices. We report a 12-year-old girl who had received a living donor liver transplant and suffered melena due to ruptured mesenteric varices. We addressed treatment of the mesenteric varices by retrograde transvenous obliteration of an abdominal wall collateral vein detected by superior mesenteric arteriography.
  • PurposeTo evaluate long-term results of stent placement retrospectively in patients with outflow block after living-donor-liver transplantation (LDLT).Materials and MethodsFor this institutional review board approved retrospective study conducted during 2002–2012, stents were placed in outflow veins in 15 patients (11.3 %, 15/133) (12 men; 3 female) in whom outflow block developed after LDLT. Their mean age was 52.3 years ± 15.3 (SD) (range, 4–69 years). Venous stenosis with a pressure gradient ≥5 mmHg (outflow block) was observed in the inferior vena cava in seven patients, hepatic vein in seven patients, and both in one patient. Technical success, change in a pressure gradient and clinical manifestations, and complicationsmore » were evaluated. Overall survival of 15 patients undergoing outflow block stenting was compared with that of 116 patients without outflow block after LDLT.ResultsStents were placed across the outflow block veins without complications, lowering the pressure gradient ≤ 3 mmHg in all patients (100 %, 15/15). Clinical manifestations improved in 11 patients (73.3 %, 11/15), and all were discharged from the hospital. However, they did not improve in the other 4 patients (26.7 %, 4/15) who died in the hospital 1.0–3.7 months after stenting (mean, 2.0 ± 1.2 months). No significant difference in 5-year survival rates was found between patients with and without outflow block after LDLT (61.1 vs. 72.2 %, p = .405).ConclusionStenting is a feasible, safe, and useful therapeutic option to resolve outflow block following LDLT, providing equal survival to that of patients without outflow block.« less