skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Asymptomatic Congenital Extradural Vertebral Arteriovenous Fistula: Treatment with Electrolytically Detachable Coils

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Ghent University Hospital, Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (Belgium)
  2. Ghent University Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery (Belgium)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21091260
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 29; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1007/s00270-004-9197-2; Copyright (c) 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.; www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CONGENITAL DISEASES; CONGENITAL MALFORMATIONS; SURGERY; VASCULAR DISEASES

Citation Formats

Keukeleire, Katrien De, Defreyne, Luc, E-mail: Luc.defreyne@ugent.be, Vanlangenhove, Peter, and Vermassen, Frank. Asymptomatic Congenital Extradural Vertebral Arteriovenous Fistula: Treatment with Electrolytically Detachable Coils. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-004-9197-2.
Keukeleire, Katrien De, Defreyne, Luc, E-mail: Luc.defreyne@ugent.be, Vanlangenhove, Peter, & Vermassen, Frank. Asymptomatic Congenital Extradural Vertebral Arteriovenous Fistula: Treatment with Electrolytically Detachable Coils. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-004-9197-2.
Keukeleire, Katrien De, Defreyne, Luc, E-mail: Luc.defreyne@ugent.be, Vanlangenhove, Peter, and Vermassen, Frank. Sat . "Asymptomatic Congenital Extradural Vertebral Arteriovenous Fistula: Treatment with Electrolytically Detachable Coils". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-004-9197-2.
@article{osti_21091260,
title = {Asymptomatic Congenital Extradural Vertebral Arteriovenous Fistula: Treatment with Electrolytically Detachable Coils},
author = {Keukeleire, Katrien De and Defreyne, Luc, E-mail: Luc.defreyne@ugent.be and Vanlangenhove, Peter and Vermassen, Frank},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-004-9197-2},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 2,
volume = 29,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
  • No abstract prepared.
  • A 70-year-old woman presented to our outpatient clinic with a large idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula (AVF). Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) using interlocking detachable coils (IDC) as an anchor was planned. However, because of markedly rapid blood flow and excessive coil flexibility, detaching an IDC carried a high risk of migration. Therefore, we first coiled multiple loops of a microcatheter and then loaded it with an IDC. In this way, the coil was well fitted to the arterial wall and could be detached by withdrawing the microcatheter during balloon occlusion ('pre-framing technique'). Complete occlusion of the afferent artery was achieved bymore » additional coiling and absolute ethanol. This technique contributed to a safe embolization of a high-flow AVF, avoiding migration of the IDC.« less
  • A 24-year-old male presented with progressive cervical myelopathy of 2 months' duration. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine and angiography revealed a large arteriovenous fistula arising from the left vertebral artery. The present case highlights the clinical features and dramatic recovery following endovascular balloon occlusion of a giant cervical arteriovenous fistula.
  • Purpose: To evaluate the indication and advantages of venous sac embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) using interlocking detachable coils (IDCs). Methods: We performed percutaneous embolization in 12 PAVMs in four patients using IDCs, initially placed in the venous sac or at the feeding artery to prevent systemic migration of additional coils. We placed the IDCs in the venous sac in PAVMs with the following vascular architecture: the draining vein was larger than the feeding arteries and both vessels were interposed with the venous sac or there were short feeding arteries. Results: Complete occlusion was achieved in all 12 PAVMsmore » without significant complications. We deployed IDCs in the venous sac in eight PAVMs and in the feeding artery in four. Conclusion: Venous sac embolization may be beneficial in PAVMs with large out-flow vessels or short feeding arteries. IDCs are suitable for this procedure.« less
  • Our objective was to evaluate the usefulness of embolizing collateral vessels using mechanically detachable coils (MDCs) in children aged 3 years or younger with congenital heart disease. The subjects were 8 children with congenital heart disease featuring collateral vessels (age 18 days-3 years): 3 with a single ventricle, 2 with the tetralogy of Fallot, 2 with pulmonary atresia, and 1 with a ventricular septal defect. The embolized vessels were the major aortopulmonary collateral artery (MAPCA) in 5 patients, the persistent left superior vena cava in 2, and the coronary arteriovenous fistula in 1. A 4 or a 5 F cathetermore » was used as the guiding device, and embolization was performed using MDCs and other conventional coils introduced through the microcatheter. One patient had growth of new MAPCAs after embolization, and these MAPCAs were also embolized with MDCs. Thus, a total of 9 embolization procedures were performed in 8 patients. Complete occlusion of the collateral vessels was achieved in 8 of 9 procedures (89%). Seven of 8 patients (88%) had uneventful courses after embolization, and MDC procedures appeared to play important roles in avoiding coil migration and achievement of safe coil embolization. One patient who underwent MAPCA embolization showed no improvement in heart function and died 2 months and 19 days later. Embolization of collateral vessels using MDCs in young children with congenital heart disease can be an effective procedure and a valuable adjunct to surgical management.« less