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Title: Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Feasibility and Results

Abstract

Purpose. To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of emergency endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Methods. During 36 months we treated, on an emergency basis, 30 AAAs with endovascular exclusion. In 21 hemodynamically stable patients preoperative CT angiography (CTA) was performed to confirm the diagnosis and to plan the treatment; 9 patients with hemorrhagic shock were evaluated with angiography performed in the operating room. Twenty-two Excluder (Gore) and 8 Zenith (Cook) stent-grafts (25 bifurcated and 5 aorto-uni-iliac) were used. The follow-up was performed by CTA at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results. Technical success was achieved in 100% of cases with a 10% mortality rate. The total complication rate was 23% (5 increases in serum creatinine level and 2 wound infections). During the follow-up, performed in 27 patients (1-36 months, mean 15.2 months), 4 secondary endoleaks (15%) (3 type II, 2 spontaneously thrombosed and 1 under observation, and 1 type III treated by iliac extender insertion) and 1 iliac leg occlusion (treated with femoro-femoral bypass) occurred. We observed a shrinkage of the aneurysmal sac in 8 of 27 cases and stability in 19 of 27 cases; we did not observe any endotension. Conclusions. Endovascular repair is a goodmore » option for emergency treatment of AAAs. The team's experience allows correct planning of the procedure in emergency situations also, with technical results comparable with elective repair. In our experience the bifurcated stent-graft is the device of choice in patients with suitable anatomy because the procedure is less time-consuming than aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafting with surgical crossover, allowing faster aneurysm exclusion. However, further studies are required to demonstrate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair compared with surgical treatment.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. University of Insubria, Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (Italy)
  2. University of Insubria, Department of Vascular Surgery (Italy)
  3. University of Insubria, Department of Anesthesiology (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21091243
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 29; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1007/s00270-005-0080-6; Copyright (c) 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.; www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ACCIDENTS; ANATOMY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BLOOD VESSELS; BYPASSES; CREATININE; GRAFTS; LEGS; PATIENTS; REPAIR; SURGERY; WOUNDS

Citation Formats

Lagana, Domenico, E-mail: monica.mangini@tin.it, Carrafiello, Gianpaolo, Mangini, Monica, Fontana, Federico, Caronno, Roberto, Castelli, Patrizio, Cuffari, Salvatore, and Fugazzola, Carlo. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Feasibility and Results. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-005-0080-6.
Lagana, Domenico, E-mail: monica.mangini@tin.it, Carrafiello, Gianpaolo, Mangini, Monica, Fontana, Federico, Caronno, Roberto, Castelli, Patrizio, Cuffari, Salvatore, & Fugazzola, Carlo. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Feasibility and Results. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-005-0080-6.
Lagana, Domenico, E-mail: monica.mangini@tin.it, Carrafiello, Gianpaolo, Mangini, Monica, Fontana, Federico, Caronno, Roberto, Castelli, Patrizio, Cuffari, Salvatore, and Fugazzola, Carlo. Sat . "Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Feasibility and Results". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-005-0080-6.
@article{osti_21091243,
title = {Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Feasibility and Results},
author = {Lagana, Domenico, E-mail: monica.mangini@tin.it and Carrafiello, Gianpaolo and Mangini, Monica and Fontana, Federico and Caronno, Roberto and Castelli, Patrizio and Cuffari, Salvatore and Fugazzola, Carlo},
abstractNote = {Purpose. To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of emergency endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Methods. During 36 months we treated, on an emergency basis, 30 AAAs with endovascular exclusion. In 21 hemodynamically stable patients preoperative CT angiography (CTA) was performed to confirm the diagnosis and to plan the treatment; 9 patients with hemorrhagic shock were evaluated with angiography performed in the operating room. Twenty-two Excluder (Gore) and 8 Zenith (Cook) stent-grafts (25 bifurcated and 5 aorto-uni-iliac) were used. The follow-up was performed by CTA at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results. Technical success was achieved in 100% of cases with a 10% mortality rate. The total complication rate was 23% (5 increases in serum creatinine level and 2 wound infections). During the follow-up, performed in 27 patients (1-36 months, mean 15.2 months), 4 secondary endoleaks (15%) (3 type II, 2 spontaneously thrombosed and 1 under observation, and 1 type III treated by iliac extender insertion) and 1 iliac leg occlusion (treated with femoro-femoral bypass) occurred. We observed a shrinkage of the aneurysmal sac in 8 of 27 cases and stability in 19 of 27 cases; we did not observe any endotension. Conclusions. Endovascular repair is a good option for emergency treatment of AAAs. The team's experience allows correct planning of the procedure in emergency situations also, with technical results comparable with elective repair. In our experience the bifurcated stent-graft is the device of choice in patients with suitable anatomy because the procedure is less time-consuming than aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafting with surgical crossover, allowing faster aneurysm exclusion. However, further studies are required to demonstrate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair compared with surgical treatment.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-005-0080-6},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 2,
volume = 29,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
  • The purpose of the note is to describe a new technique for type II endoleak treatment, using an alternative approach through femoral venous access. Three patients who developed type II endoleak after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm were treated with direct transcaval puncture and embolization inside the aneurysm sac. The detailed technique is described. All patients were treated without any complications and discharged 48 hours after the treatment. At 1 month follow-up the computed tomograph scan did not show a recurrence of a type II endoleak. The management of patients with type II endoleak is a controversial issue andmore » different techniques have been proposed. We suggest an alternative technique for type II endoleak treatment. The feasibility and the advantages of this approach can offer new possibilities for the diagnosis as well as for the treatment of this complication.« less
  • The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of percutaneous endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) previously treated by EVAR. In the last year, two male patients with AAAs, treated 8 and 23 months ago with bifurcated stent-graft, were observed because of lumbar pain and hemorragic shock. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) showed a retroperitoneal hematoma; in both cases a type III endoleak was detected, in one case associated with a type II endoleak from the iliolumbar artery. The procedures were performed in the theater, in emergency. Type II endoleak was treated with transcatheter superselectivemore » glue injection; type III endoleaks were excluded by a stent-graft extension. The procedures were successful in both patients, with immediate hemodynamic stabilization. MDCT after the procedure showed complete exclusion of the aneurysms. In conclusion, endovascular treatment is a safe and feasible option for the treatment of ruptured AAAs previously treated by EVAR; this approach allows avoidance of surgical conversion, which is technical very challenging, with a high morbidity and mortality rate.« less
  • Several studies have observed both higher mortality rates and lower utilization of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) at low-volume centers. This article presents the results of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair at a low-volume center in the endovascular era and investigates whether postprocedural mortality can be improved by extension of EVAR application also in this setting. This is an 11.6-year retrospective cohort study of 132 patients undergoing elective surgical or endovascular AAA repair at a tertiary care academic hospital between 1997 and July 2008, i.e., a median volume of 12 cases per year. The study was divided into two periodsmore » of time according to the respective indications and contraindications for EVAR, which substantially changed in 2005. During period 1, only aneurysms with necks {>=}20 mm long and not involving the iliac arteries were treated endoluminally. Beginning in 2005, indication for EVAR was expanded to aortoiliac aneurysms with a minimum neck length of 15 mm. Preoperative risk was assessed by the SVS/AAVS comorbidity score. During the first period (1997-2004) 18.4% (16/87) of all patients received EVAR. By extending anatomical confines and indications for EVAR in 2005, the utilization rate of EVAR increased to 40.0% (18/45) during the second period (2005-July 2008; p = 0.007). Prevalence of preoperative risk factors did not change during the two observation periods. In contrast to period 1, high-risk patients were preferentially treated endoluminally during the second period, resulting in a significantly higher median SVS/AAVS score in the EVAR group (p < 0.001). A significant decrease in median length of stay at the intensive/intermediate care unit (5 vs. 2 days; p = 0.006) and length of in-hospital stay (20 vs. 12.5 days; p < 0.001) was observed during period 2. Overall perioperative mortality was reduced from 6.9% during the first period to 2.2% during the second period (p = 0.256). EVAR mortality was 0%, mortality after open repair was reduced from 8.5% to 3.7% (p = 0.414). In conclusion, by risk-adjusted selection of treatment and frequent application of EVAR, it is possible to improve perioperative outcome of elective AAA repair at a low-volume hospital. Mortality figures are similar to those of recent trials at high-volume centers, as reported in the literature.« less
  • The endovascular procedure for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has had an enormous impact on the treatment of this challenging disease. Complications, however, do occur and it is important to have a thorough understanding of the array of complications and appropriate management strategies. In this review of endovascular complications, we describe early and late complications paying particular attention to preventive, treatment and surveillance strategies.
  • Purpose. To evaluate the volumetric changes in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) after endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) in 24 months of follow-up. Methods. We evaluated the volume modifications in 63 consecutive patients after EVAR. All patients underwent strict duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography (CTA) follow-up; when complications were suspected, digital subtraction angiography was also performed. CTA datasets at 1, 6, 12, and 24 months were post-processed through semiautomatic segmentation, to isolate the aneurysmal sac and calculate its volume. Maximum transverse diameters (Dmax) were also obtained in the true axial plane, Presence and type of endoleak (EL) were recorded. A statisticalmore » analysis was performed to assess the degree of volume change, correlation with diameter modifications, and significance of the volume increase with respect to ELs. Results. Mean reconstruction time was 7 min. Mean volume reduction rates were 6.5%, 8%, and 9.6% at 6, 12, and 24 months follow-up, respectively. Mean Dmax reduction rates were 4.2%, 6.7%, and 12%; correlation with volumes was poor (r = 0.73-0.81). ELs were found in 19 patients and were more frequent (p = 0.04) in patients with higher preprocedural Dmax, The accuracies of volume changes in predicting ELs ranged between 74.6% and 84.1% and were higher than those of Dmax modifications. The strongest independent predictor of EL was a volume change at 6 months {<=}0.3% (p = 0.005), although 6 of 19 (32%) patients with EL showed no significant AAA enlargement, whereas in 6 of 44 (14%) patients without EL the aneurysm enlarged. Conclusion. The lack of volume decrease in the aneurysm of at least 0.3% at 6 months follow-up indicates the need for closer surveillance, and has a higher predictive accuracy for an endoleak than Dmax.« less