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Title: Use of a Collagen-Based Device for Closure of Low Brachial Artery Punctures

Abstract

Purpose. To report our experience with the Angioseal vascular closure device for hemostasis of distal brachial artery puncture. Methods. Between September 2003 and August 2005, 64 Angioseal vascular closure devices were inserted in 64 patients (40 men, 24 women; mean age 65 years) immediately after diagnostic or therapeutic arterial angiographies performed through a 5 Fr to 7 Fr sheath via the distal brachial artery. Ultrasound examination of the brachial artery preceded the angiography in all cases and only arteries wider than 4 mm were closed by the Angioseal. In cases of a sonographically evident thin subcutaneous space of the cubital fossa, tissue tumescence, using 1% Lidocaine, was performed prior to the arterial closure. Results. The deployment success rate was 100%. No major complications were encountered; only 2 patients developed puncture site hematoma, and these were followed conservatively. Conclusions. Closure of low brachial artery punctures with the Angioseal is simple and safe. No additional manual compression is required. We recommend its use after brachial artery access interventions, through appropriately wide arteries, to improve early patient ambulation and potentially reduce possible puncture site complications.

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson and Glolda Campuses, Petah Tiqwa, Sakler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Department of Interventional Radiology (Israel), E-mail: atareli@hotmail.com
  2. Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson and Glolda Campuses, Petah Tiqwa, Sakler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Department of Surgery (Israel)
  3. Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson and Glolda Campuses, Petah Tiqwa, Sakler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Department of Radiology (Israel)
  4. Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Israel)
  5. Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson and Glolda Campuses, Petah Tiqwa, Sakler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Department of Interventional Radiology (Israel)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21091006
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 30; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1007/s00270-006-0061-4; Copyright (c) 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.; www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ARTERIES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COLLAGEN; COMPRESSION; HEMATOMAS; PATIENTS

Citation Formats

Belenky, A., Aranovich, D., Greif, F., Bachar, G., Bartal, G., and Atar, E. Use of a Collagen-Based Device for Closure of Low Brachial Artery Punctures. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-006-0061-4.
Belenky, A., Aranovich, D., Greif, F., Bachar, G., Bartal, G., & Atar, E. Use of a Collagen-Based Device for Closure of Low Brachial Artery Punctures. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-006-0061-4.
Belenky, A., Aranovich, D., Greif, F., Bachar, G., Bartal, G., and Atar, E. Sun . "Use of a Collagen-Based Device for Closure of Low Brachial Artery Punctures". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-006-0061-4.
@article{osti_21091006,
title = {Use of a Collagen-Based Device for Closure of Low Brachial Artery Punctures},
author = {Belenky, A. and Aranovich, D. and Greif, F. and Bachar, G. and Bartal, G. and Atar, E.},
abstractNote = {Purpose. To report our experience with the Angioseal vascular closure device for hemostasis of distal brachial artery puncture. Methods. Between September 2003 and August 2005, 64 Angioseal vascular closure devices were inserted in 64 patients (40 men, 24 women; mean age 65 years) immediately after diagnostic or therapeutic arterial angiographies performed through a 5 Fr to 7 Fr sheath via the distal brachial artery. Ultrasound examination of the brachial artery preceded the angiography in all cases and only arteries wider than 4 mm were closed by the Angioseal. In cases of a sonographically evident thin subcutaneous space of the cubital fossa, tissue tumescence, using 1% Lidocaine, was performed prior to the arterial closure. Results. The deployment success rate was 100%. No major complications were encountered; only 2 patients developed puncture site hematoma, and these were followed conservatively. Conclusions. Closure of low brachial artery punctures with the Angioseal is simple and safe. No additional manual compression is required. We recommend its use after brachial artery access interventions, through appropriately wide arteries, to improve early patient ambulation and potentially reduce possible puncture site complications.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-006-0061-4},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 2,
volume = 30,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}