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Title: Investigation of the interaction of dimethyl sulfoxide with lipid membranes by small-angle neutron scattering

Abstract

The influence of dimethyl sulfoxide (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}SO (DMSO) on the structure of membranes of 1,2-dimiristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) in an excess of a water-DMSO solvent is investigated over a wide range of DMSO molar concentrations 0.0 {<=} X{sub DMSO} {<=} 1.0 at temperatures T = 12.5 and 55 deg. C. The dependences of the repeat distance d of multilamellar membranes and the thickness d{sub b} of single vesicles on the molar concentration X{sub DMSO} in the L{sub {beta}}{sub '} gel and L{sub {alpha}} liquid-crystalline phases are determined by small-angle neutron scattering. The intermembrane distance d{sub s} is determined from the repeat distance d and the membrane thickness d{sub b}. It is shown that an increase in the molar concentration X{sub DMSO} leads to a considerable decrease in the intermembrane distance and that, at X{sub DMSO} = 0.4, the neighboring membranes are virtually in steric contact with each other. The use of the deuterated phospholipid (DMSO-D6) and the contrast variation method makes it possible, for the first time, to determine the number of DMSO molecules strongly bound to the membrane.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21090900
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Crystallography Reports; Journal Volume: 52; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1134/S1063774507030364; Copyright (c) 2007 Nauka/Interperiodica; Article Copyright (c) 2007 Pleiades Publishing, Inc; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; DMSO; LECITHINS; MEMBRANES; NEUTRON DIFFRACTION; SMALL ANGLE SCATTERING

Citation Formats

Gorshkova, J. E., E-mail: gorshk@nf.jinr.ru, and Gordeliy, V. I.. Investigation of the interaction of dimethyl sulfoxide with lipid membranes by small-angle neutron scattering. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1134/S1063774507030364.
Gorshkova, J. E., E-mail: gorshk@nf.jinr.ru, & Gordeliy, V. I.. Investigation of the interaction of dimethyl sulfoxide with lipid membranes by small-angle neutron scattering. United States. doi:10.1134/S1063774507030364.
Gorshkova, J. E., E-mail: gorshk@nf.jinr.ru, and Gordeliy, V. I.. Tue . "Investigation of the interaction of dimethyl sulfoxide with lipid membranes by small-angle neutron scattering". United States. doi:10.1134/S1063774507030364.
@article{osti_21090900,
title = {Investigation of the interaction of dimethyl sulfoxide with lipid membranes by small-angle neutron scattering},
author = {Gorshkova, J. E., E-mail: gorshk@nf.jinr.ru and Gordeliy, V. I.},
abstractNote = {The influence of dimethyl sulfoxide (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}SO (DMSO) on the structure of membranes of 1,2-dimiristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) in an excess of a water-DMSO solvent is investigated over a wide range of DMSO molar concentrations 0.0 {<=} X{sub DMSO} {<=} 1.0 at temperatures T = 12.5 and 55 deg. C. The dependences of the repeat distance d of multilamellar membranes and the thickness d{sub b} of single vesicles on the molar concentration X{sub DMSO} in the L{sub {beta}}{sub '} gel and L{sub {alpha}} liquid-crystalline phases are determined by small-angle neutron scattering. The intermembrane distance d{sub s} is determined from the repeat distance d and the membrane thickness d{sub b}. It is shown that an increase in the molar concentration X{sub DMSO} leads to a considerable decrease in the intermembrane distance and that, at X{sub DMSO} = 0.4, the neighboring membranes are virtually in steric contact with each other. The use of the deuterated phospholipid (DMSO-D6) and the contrast variation method makes it possible, for the first time, to determine the number of DMSO molecules strongly bound to the membrane.},
doi = {10.1134/S1063774507030364},
journal = {Crystallography Reports},
number = 3,
volume = 52,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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  • No abstract prepared.