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Title: Radiological Management of Superior Vena Caval Stent Migration and Infection

Abstract

We report a case of venous obstruction secondary to Hodgkin's lymphoma. Multiple Wallstents were inserted into the superior vena cava to relieve obstructive symptoms secondary to tumor. This procedure was complicated by stent migration into the right ventricle and a presumed stent infection. We describe the percutaneous management of these complications and discuss the issues surrounding the use of stents in this setting. We conclude that these complications can be managed percutaneously. However, the technical details of stent placement are essential in minimizing complications of this type.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Queen Elizabeth Hospital (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21088182
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 28; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1007/s00270-003-0183-x; Copyright (c) 2005 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.; www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; INFECTIOUS DISEASES; LYMPHOMAS; SYMPTOMS; VASCULAR DISEASES

Citation Formats

Srinathan, Sadeesh, E-mail: sadeesh@macunlimited.net, McCafferty, Ian, and Wilson, Ian. Radiological Management of Superior Vena Caval Stent Migration and Infection. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-003-0183-X.
Srinathan, Sadeesh, E-mail: sadeesh@macunlimited.net, McCafferty, Ian, & Wilson, Ian. Radiological Management of Superior Vena Caval Stent Migration and Infection. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-003-0183-X.
Srinathan, Sadeesh, E-mail: sadeesh@macunlimited.net, McCafferty, Ian, and Wilson, Ian. 2005. "Radiological Management of Superior Vena Caval Stent Migration and Infection". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-003-0183-X.
@article{osti_21088182,
title = {Radiological Management of Superior Vena Caval Stent Migration and Infection},
author = {Srinathan, Sadeesh, E-mail: sadeesh@macunlimited.net and McCafferty, Ian and Wilson, Ian},
abstractNote = {We report a case of venous obstruction secondary to Hodgkin's lymphoma. Multiple Wallstents were inserted into the superior vena cava to relieve obstructive symptoms secondary to tumor. This procedure was complicated by stent migration into the right ventricle and a presumed stent infection. We describe the percutaneous management of these complications and discuss the issues surrounding the use of stents in this setting. We conclude that these complications can be managed percutaneously. However, the technical details of stent placement are essential in minimizing complications of this type.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-003-0183-X},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 1,
volume = 28,
place = {United States},
year = 2005,
month = 1
}
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