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Title: Dislocation-related luminescence in silicon, caused by implantation of oxygen ions and subsequent annealing

Abstract

Multiple implantation of oxygen ions with energies of 0.1-1.5 MeV at doses of 7 x 10{sup 13}-2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and subsequent annealing in a chlorine-containing atmosphere at 900 deg. C for 4 h give rise to dislocation-related luminescence in p-Si. A p {sup {yields}} n conductivity-type conversion is also observed in this case in the surface layer of Si, which indicates that electrically active donor centers are formed in the process. Preliminary heat treatment of wafers covered with an erbium-doped film of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in argon at 1250 deg. C for 1 h does not preclude the appearance of dislocation-related luminescence, but affects the parameters of the dislocation-related lines (peak positions and intensities)

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21088105
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Semiconductors; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1134/S1063782607030086; Copyright (c) 2007 Nauka/Interperiodica; Article Copyright (c) 2007 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ANNEALING; ARGON; DISLOCATIONS; DOPED MATERIALS; FILMS; LUMINESCENCE; MEV RANGE 01-10; OXYGEN IONS; RADIATION DOSES; SILICON

Citation Formats

Sobolev, N. A., E-mail: nick@sobolev.ioffe.rssi.ru, Ber, B. Ya., Emel'yanov, A. M., Kovarskii, A. P., and Shek, E. I. Dislocation-related luminescence in silicon, caused by implantation of oxygen ions and subsequent annealing. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1134/S1063782607030086.
Sobolev, N. A., E-mail: nick@sobolev.ioffe.rssi.ru, Ber, B. Ya., Emel'yanov, A. M., Kovarskii, A. P., & Shek, E. I. Dislocation-related luminescence in silicon, caused by implantation of oxygen ions and subsequent annealing. United States. doi:10.1134/S1063782607030086.
Sobolev, N. A., E-mail: nick@sobolev.ioffe.rssi.ru, Ber, B. Ya., Emel'yanov, A. M., Kovarskii, A. P., and Shek, E. I. Thu . "Dislocation-related luminescence in silicon, caused by implantation of oxygen ions and subsequent annealing". United States. doi:10.1134/S1063782607030086.
@article{osti_21088105,
title = {Dislocation-related luminescence in silicon, caused by implantation of oxygen ions and subsequent annealing},
author = {Sobolev, N. A., E-mail: nick@sobolev.ioffe.rssi.ru and Ber, B. Ya. and Emel'yanov, A. M. and Kovarskii, A. P. and Shek, E. I.},
abstractNote = {Multiple implantation of oxygen ions with energies of 0.1-1.5 MeV at doses of 7 x 10{sup 13}-2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and subsequent annealing in a chlorine-containing atmosphere at 900 deg. C for 4 h give rise to dislocation-related luminescence in p-Si. A p {sup {yields}} n conductivity-type conversion is also observed in this case in the surface layer of Si, which indicates that electrically active donor centers are formed in the process. Preliminary heat treatment of wafers covered with an erbium-doped film of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in argon at 1250 deg. C for 1 h does not preclude the appearance of dislocation-related luminescence, but affects the parameters of the dislocation-related lines (peak positions and intensities)},
doi = {10.1134/S1063782607030086},
journal = {Semiconductors},
number = 3,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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