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Title: EBIC characterization of light-emitting structures based on GaN

Abstract

EBIC investigations of light-emitting structures based on InGaN/GaN MQW with different numbers of wells have been carried out. A pronounced dependence of collection efficiency on quantum-well number is observed. A comparison with apparent carrier profiles calculated from C-V curves reveals a correlation between the collection efficiency and location of quantum well inside the depletion region. Defects producing bright EBIC contrast are revealed in the structure with five quantum wells. This contrast is associated with defects locally decreasing the excess carrier recombination inside quantum wells.

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation), E-mail: Natalia.Shmidt@mail.ioffe.ru
  2. Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronics Technology (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21088073
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Semiconductors; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1134/S1063782607040264; Copyright (c) 2007 Nauka/Interperiodica; Article Copyright (c) 2007 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; EFFICIENCY; GALLIUM NITRIDES; INDIUM COMPOUNDS; QUANTUM WELLS; RECOMBINATION; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Shmidt, N. M., Vergeles, P. S., and Yakimov, E. B. EBIC characterization of light-emitting structures based on GaN. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1134/S1063782607040264.
Shmidt, N. M., Vergeles, P. S., & Yakimov, E. B. EBIC characterization of light-emitting structures based on GaN. United States. doi:10.1134/S1063782607040264.
Shmidt, N. M., Vergeles, P. S., and Yakimov, E. B. Sun . "EBIC characterization of light-emitting structures based on GaN". United States. doi:10.1134/S1063782607040264.
@article{osti_21088073,
title = {EBIC characterization of light-emitting structures based on GaN},
author = {Shmidt, N. M. and Vergeles, P. S. and Yakimov, E. B.},
abstractNote = {EBIC investigations of light-emitting structures based on InGaN/GaN MQW with different numbers of wells have been carried out. A pronounced dependence of collection efficiency on quantum-well number is observed. A comparison with apparent carrier profiles calculated from C-V curves reveals a correlation between the collection efficiency and location of quantum well inside the depletion region. Defects producing bright EBIC contrast are revealed in the structure with five quantum wells. This contrast is associated with defects locally decreasing the excess carrier recombination inside quantum wells.},
doi = {10.1134/S1063782607040264},
journal = {Semiconductors},
number = 4,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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