skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Reconstruction of the InSb (111)In surface as a result of sulfur adsorption

Abstract

The variation in reconstruction in the InSb (111)In surface during adsorption of sulfur and annealing in ultrahigh vacuum was investigated by methods of low-energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. It is shown that evolution of reconstruction of the InSb (111)In surface substantially depends on the starting thickness of the adsorbed S layer on the surface. If the thickness of the S layer is only slightly larger than that of the monolayer, reconstruction (1 x 1) is formed on the surface, which transforms into reconstruction (2 x 2) during the subsequent annealing. If the S layer is several monolayers thick, this layer is initially amorphous. Annealing of such a surface at 315-325 deg. C can lead to the formation of reconstruction ({radical}3 x {radical}3)-R30 deg., which transforms into reconstruction (2 x 2) at a higher temperature. This reconstruction is retained during further annealing until the S atoms vanish from the surface completely. It is shown for the first time that the reconstruction ({radical}3 x {radical}3)-R30 deg. can form during adsorption of chalcogenide atoms on the III-V (111)III surface.

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation), E-mail: mleb@triat.ioffe.ru
  2. Shizuouka University, Nano-Device Process Lab, Research Institute of Electronics (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21088067
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Semiconductors; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1134/S1063782607050077; Copyright (c) 2007 Nauka/Interperiodica; Article Copyright (c) 2007 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ADSORPTION; ANNEALING; AUGER ELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY; ELECTRON DIFFRACTION; INDIUM ANTIMONIDES; LAYERS; SULFUR; SURFACES; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0400-1000 K

Citation Formats

Lebedev, M. V., Shimomura, M., and Fukuda, Y. Reconstruction of the InSb (111)In surface as a result of sulfur adsorption. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1134/S1063782607050077.
Lebedev, M. V., Shimomura, M., & Fukuda, Y. Reconstruction of the InSb (111)In surface as a result of sulfur adsorption. United States. doi:10.1134/S1063782607050077.
Lebedev, M. V., Shimomura, M., and Fukuda, Y. Tue . "Reconstruction of the InSb (111)In surface as a result of sulfur adsorption". United States. doi:10.1134/S1063782607050077.
@article{osti_21088067,
title = {Reconstruction of the InSb (111)In surface as a result of sulfur adsorption},
author = {Lebedev, M. V. and Shimomura, M. and Fukuda, Y.},
abstractNote = {The variation in reconstruction in the InSb (111)In surface during adsorption of sulfur and annealing in ultrahigh vacuum was investigated by methods of low-energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. It is shown that evolution of reconstruction of the InSb (111)In surface substantially depends on the starting thickness of the adsorbed S layer on the surface. If the thickness of the S layer is only slightly larger than that of the monolayer, reconstruction (1 x 1) is formed on the surface, which transforms into reconstruction (2 x 2) during the subsequent annealing. If the S layer is several monolayers thick, this layer is initially amorphous. Annealing of such a surface at 315-325 deg. C can lead to the formation of reconstruction ({radical}3 x {radical}3)-R30 deg., which transforms into reconstruction (2 x 2) at a higher temperature. This reconstruction is retained during further annealing until the S atoms vanish from the surface completely. It is shown for the first time that the reconstruction ({radical}3 x {radical}3)-R30 deg. can form during adsorption of chalcogenide atoms on the III-V (111)III surface.},
doi = {10.1134/S1063782607050077},
journal = {Semiconductors},
number = 5,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • The chemisorption of sulfur and CO was found to have profound effects on the structure of s stepped platinum surface. By itself, sulfur chemisorbs, forming a {ital p}(2{times}2) ordered structure, and destabilizes the step structure by inducing doubling of the terrace widths and step heights. Subsequent coadsorption of CO displaces the sulfur, compressing it to distances of {radical}3 times the Pt lattice spacing. In addition to displacing S, CO enhances Pt atom diffusion from the double heights steps, restructuring the surface by forming new terraces separated by monatomic height steps. These new terraces contain exclusively CO, while the compressed sulfurmore » overlayer is found on the alternating terraces. The segregation of CO and S and their effect on the substrate morphology has strong implications in the mechanisms of surface catalyzed reactions. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}« less
  • We employ room-temperature ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy and ab-initio calculations to study graphene flakes that were adsorbed onto the Si(111)–7 × 7 surface. The characteristic 7 × 7 reconstruction of this semiconductor substrate can be resolved through graphene at all scanning biases, thus indicating that the atomistic configuration of the semiconducting substrate is not altered upon graphene adsorption. Large-scale ab-initio calculations confirm these experimental observations and point to a lack of chemical bonding among interfacial graphene and silicon atoms. Our work provides insight into atomic-scale chemistry between graphene and highly reactive surfaces, directing future passivation and chemical interaction work in graphene-based heterostructures.
  • A rich menagerie of structures is identified at 5 K following adsorption of low coverages (≤0.05 monolayers) of S on Cu(111) at room temperature. This paper emphasizes the reconstructions at the steps. The A-type close-packed step has 1 row of S atoms along its lower edge, where S atoms occupy alternating pseudo-fourfold-hollow (p4fh) sites. Additionally, there are 2 rows of S atoms of equal density on the upper edge, bridging a row of extra Cu atoms, together creating an extended chain. The B-type close-packed step exhibits an even more complex reconstruction, in which triangle-shaped groups of Cu atoms shift outmore » of their original sites and form a base for S adsorption at (mostly) 4fh sites. We propose a mechanism by which these triangles could generate Cu–S complexes and short chains like those observed on the terraces.« less
  • The effect of sulfur (S) on oxygen chemisorption and the initial stages of oxidation of the Ni(111) crystal surface have been studied with Auger electron spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at room temperature under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. It is found that sulfur strongly retards the oxygen adsorption kinetics, but does not change the oxidation mechanism. The initial chemisorption sticking coefficient ({ital s}) is found to follow the relationship {ital s} {proportional to} (1 {minus} 3{theta}{sub {ital s}}){sup 2}, where {theta}{sub {ital s}} is the S coverage. Oxidation of S precovered surfaces can be described fairly well bymore » an island growth model; the decrease in oxidation rate, relative to that of the S-free surface, can be attributed to the reduction in the density of oxide nuclei. Some experimental observations indicate that the oxide layer is partially removed by S at 440 K. Sulfur is believed to remain at the Ni/NiO interface during oxidation.« less
  • The existence of CH{sub 3} adsorbates on (111) surface of chemical vapor deposited diamond, which was observed by scanning tunneling microscopy, was explained by the following S{sub N}2 (bimolecular, substitutional, and nucleophilic) type surface reaction; C(s){sup {minus}}+C{sub 2}H{sub 6}{r_arrow}C(s){minus}CH{sub 3}+CH{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, where C(s) denotes a surface carbon atom. The activation energy was estimated to be 36.78 kcal/mol and the reaction proved to be exothermic with the enthalpy change of {minus}9.250 kcal/mol, according to ab initio molecular orbital calculations at MP2/3-21+G{sup *}//RHF/3-21G{sup *} level; this result is consistent with typical substrate temperatures, namely about 900{degree}C, for chemical vapor deposition ofmore » diamond. Charge transfer from the highest occupied molecular orbital of the surface anionic site to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of ethane, that is antibonding at the CH{sub 3}{endash}CH{sub 3} bond, has been clearly visualized. A characteristic configuration of an ethane molecule which is associated with an anionic vacant site C(s){sup {minus}} on hydrogenated (111) surface of diamond was also found. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.« less