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Title: Phase separation in the crust of accreting neutron stars

Abstract

Nucleosynthesis, on the surface of accreting neutron stars, produces a range of chemical elements. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of crystallization to see how this complex composition forms new neutron star crust. We find chemical separation, with the liquid ocean phase greatly enriched in low atomic number elements compared to the solid crust. This phase separation should change many crust properties such as the thermal conductivity and shear modulus.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics and Nuclear Theory Center, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21075552
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. E, Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.066101; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ATOMIC NUMBER; CRYSTALLIZATION; MOLECULAR DYNAMICS METHOD; NEUTRON STARS; NUCLEOSYNTHESIS; SIMULATION; THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY

Citation Formats

Horowitz, C. J., Berry, D. K., Brown, E. F., University Information Technology Services, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408, and Department of Physics and Astronomy, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824. Phase separation in the crust of accreting neutron stars. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVE.75.066101.
Horowitz, C. J., Berry, D. K., Brown, E. F., University Information Technology Services, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408, & Department of Physics and Astronomy, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824. Phase separation in the crust of accreting neutron stars. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVE.75.066101.
Horowitz, C. J., Berry, D. K., Brown, E. F., University Information Technology Services, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408, and Department of Physics and Astronomy, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824. 2007. "Phase separation in the crust of accreting neutron stars". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVE.75.066101.
@article{osti_21075552,
title = {Phase separation in the crust of accreting neutron stars},
author = {Horowitz, C. J. and Berry, D. K. and Brown, E. F. and University Information Technology Services, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 and Department of Physics and Astronomy, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824},
abstractNote = {Nucleosynthesis, on the surface of accreting neutron stars, produces a range of chemical elements. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of crystallization to see how this complex composition forms new neutron star crust. We find chemical separation, with the liquid ocean phase greatly enriched in low atomic number elements compared to the solid crust. This phase separation should change many crust properties such as the thermal conductivity and shear modulus.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVE.75.066101},
journal = {Physical Review. E, Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics},
number = 6,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = 2007,
month = 6
}
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