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Title: Some interesting consequences of the maximum entropy production principle

Abstract

Two nonequilibrium phase transitions (morphological and hydrodynamic) are analyzed by applying the maximum entropy production principle. Quantitative analysis is for the first time compared with experiment. Nonequilibrium crystallization of ice and laminar-turbulent flow transition in a circular pipe are examined as examples of morphological and hydrodynamic transitions, respectively. For the latter transition, a minimum critical Reynolds number of 1200 is predicted. A discussion of this important and interesting result is presented.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Industrial Ecology, Ural Division (Russian Federation), E-mail: mlm@ecko.uran.ru
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21072490
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Physics; Journal Volume: 104; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1134/S1063776107040152; Copyright (c) 2007 Nauka/Interperiodica; Article Copyright (c) 2007 Pleiades Publishing, Inc; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; CRYSTALLIZATION; ENTROPY; ICE; REYNOLDS NUMBER; TURBULENT FLOW

Citation Formats

Martyushev, L. M. Some interesting consequences of the maximum entropy production principle. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1134/S1063776107040152.
Martyushev, L. M. Some interesting consequences of the maximum entropy production principle. United States. doi:10.1134/S1063776107040152.
Martyushev, L. M. Sun . "Some interesting consequences of the maximum entropy production principle". United States. doi:10.1134/S1063776107040152.
@article{osti_21072490,
title = {Some interesting consequences of the maximum entropy production principle},
author = {Martyushev, L. M.},
abstractNote = {Two nonequilibrium phase transitions (morphological and hydrodynamic) are analyzed by applying the maximum entropy production principle. Quantitative analysis is for the first time compared with experiment. Nonequilibrium crystallization of ice and laminar-turbulent flow transition in a circular pipe are examined as examples of morphological and hydrodynamic transitions, respectively. For the latter transition, a minimum critical Reynolds number of 1200 is predicted. A discussion of this important and interesting result is presented.},
doi = {10.1134/S1063776107040152},
journal = {Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 104,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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