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Title: Compression of powerful x-ray pulses to attosecond durations by stimulated Raman backscattering in plasmas

Abstract

Backward Raman amplification (BRA) in plasmas holds the potential for longitudinal compression and focusing of powerful x-ray pulses. In principle, this method is capable of producing pulse intensities close to the vacuum breakdown threshold by manipulating the output of planned x-ray sources. The minimum wavelength limit of BRA applicability to compression of laser pulses in plasmas is found.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21072387
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. E, Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.026404; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; AMPLIFICATION; BACKSCATTERING; COMPRESSION; FOCUSING; LASER RADIATION; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; PLASMA; PULSES; RAMAN EFFECT; WAVELENGTHS; X RADIATION; X-RAY SOURCES

Citation Formats

Malkin, V. M., Fisch, N. J., Wurtele, J. S., and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720. Compression of powerful x-ray pulses to attosecond durations by stimulated Raman backscattering in plasmas. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVE.75.026404.
Malkin, V. M., Fisch, N. J., Wurtele, J. S., & Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720. Compression of powerful x-ray pulses to attosecond durations by stimulated Raman backscattering in plasmas. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVE.75.026404.
Malkin, V. M., Fisch, N. J., Wurtele, J. S., and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720. Thu . "Compression of powerful x-ray pulses to attosecond durations by stimulated Raman backscattering in plasmas". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVE.75.026404.
@article{osti_21072387,
title = {Compression of powerful x-ray pulses to attosecond durations by stimulated Raman backscattering in plasmas},
author = {Malkin, V. M. and Fisch, N. J. and Wurtele, J. S. and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720},
abstractNote = {Backward Raman amplification (BRA) in plasmas holds the potential for longitudinal compression and focusing of powerful x-ray pulses. In principle, this method is capable of producing pulse intensities close to the vacuum breakdown threshold by manipulating the output of planned x-ray sources. The minimum wavelength limit of BRA applicability to compression of laser pulses in plasmas is found.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVE.75.026404},
journal = {Physical Review. E, Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics},
number = 2,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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