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Title: Modeling of atmospheric-pressure plasma columns sustained by surface waves

Abstract

A self-consistent two-dimensional fluid-plasma model coupled to Maxwell's equations is presented for argon discharges sustained at atmospheric pressure by the propagation of an electromagnetic surface wave. The numerical simulation provides the full axial and radial structure of the surface-wave plasma column and the distribution of the electromagnetic fields for given discharge operating conditions. To describe the contraction phenomenon, a characteristic feature of high-pressure discharges, we consider the kinetics of argon molecular ions in the charged-particle balance. An original feature of the model is to take into account the gas flow by solving self-consistently the mass, momentum, and energy balance equations for neutral particles. Accounting for the gas flow explains reported discrepancies between measured and calculated plasma parameters when assuming the local axial uniformity approximation. In contrast to the low-pressure case, the latter approximation is shown to be of limited validity at atmospheric pressure. The gas temperature is found to be a key parameter in modeling surface-wave discharges sustained at atmospheric pressure. It determines the radial and the axial structure of the plasma column. The calculated plasma parameters and wave propagation characteristics using the present two-dimensional fluid model are in good agreement with our set of experimental data.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)
  2. (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21072278
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. E, Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.016402; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; APPROXIMATIONS; ARGON; ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE; DISTRIBUTION; ELECTRIC DISCHARGES; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ELECTRON TEMPERATURE; GAS FLOW; ION TEMPERATURE; MAXWELL EQUATIONS; MOLECULAR IONS; NEUTRAL PARTICLES; PLASMA; PLASMA SIMULATION; PLASMA SURFACE WAVES; TWO-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; WAVE PROPAGATION

Citation Formats

Kabouzi, Y., Graves, D. B., Castanos-Martinez, E., Moisan, M., and Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, H3C 3J7. Modeling of atmospheric-pressure plasma columns sustained by surface waves. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVE.75.016402.
Kabouzi, Y., Graves, D. B., Castanos-Martinez, E., Moisan, M., & Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, H3C 3J7. Modeling of atmospheric-pressure plasma columns sustained by surface waves. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVE.75.016402.
Kabouzi, Y., Graves, D. B., Castanos-Martinez, E., Moisan, M., and Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, H3C 3J7. Mon . "Modeling of atmospheric-pressure plasma columns sustained by surface waves". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVE.75.016402.
@article{osti_21072278,
title = {Modeling of atmospheric-pressure plasma columns sustained by surface waves},
author = {Kabouzi, Y. and Graves, D. B. and Castanos-Martinez, E. and Moisan, M. and Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, H3C 3J7},
abstractNote = {A self-consistent two-dimensional fluid-plasma model coupled to Maxwell's equations is presented for argon discharges sustained at atmospheric pressure by the propagation of an electromagnetic surface wave. The numerical simulation provides the full axial and radial structure of the surface-wave plasma column and the distribution of the electromagnetic fields for given discharge operating conditions. To describe the contraction phenomenon, a characteristic feature of high-pressure discharges, we consider the kinetics of argon molecular ions in the charged-particle balance. An original feature of the model is to take into account the gas flow by solving self-consistently the mass, momentum, and energy balance equations for neutral particles. Accounting for the gas flow explains reported discrepancies between measured and calculated plasma parameters when assuming the local axial uniformity approximation. In contrast to the low-pressure case, the latter approximation is shown to be of limited validity at atmospheric pressure. The gas temperature is found to be a key parameter in modeling surface-wave discharges sustained at atmospheric pressure. It determines the radial and the axial structure of the plasma column. The calculated plasma parameters and wave propagation characteristics using the present two-dimensional fluid model are in good agreement with our set of experimental data.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVE.75.016402},
journal = {Physical Review. E, Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics},
number = 1,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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