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Title: Production of proton beams with narrow-band energy spectra from laser-irradiated ultrathin foils

Abstract

Three-dimensional gridless particle simulations of proton acceleration via irradiation of a very thin foil by a short-pulse, high-intensity laser have been performed to evaluate recently proposed microstructured target configurations. It is found that a pure proton microdot target does not by itself result in a quasimonoenergetic proton beam. Such a beam can only be produced with a very lightly doped target, in qualitative agreement with one-dimensional theory. The simulations suggest that beam quality in current experiments could be dramatically improved by choosing microdot compositions with a 5-10 times lower proton fraction.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Central Laser Facility, Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)
  2. John von Neumann Institute for Computing, ZAM, Forschungzentrum Juelich GmbH, D-52425, Juelich (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21072274
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. E, Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.015401; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; ACCELERATION; BEAM-PLASMA SYSTEMS; DOPED MATERIALS; ENERGY SPECTRA; FOILS; IRRADIATION; LASERS; ONE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; PLASMA PRODUCTION; PLASMA SIMULATION; PROTON BEAMS; PROTONS; PULSES; THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS

Citation Formats

Robinson, A. P. L, and Gibbon, P. Production of proton beams with narrow-band energy spectra from laser-irradiated ultrathin foils. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVE.75.015401.
Robinson, A. P. L, & Gibbon, P. Production of proton beams with narrow-band energy spectra from laser-irradiated ultrathin foils. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVE.75.015401.
Robinson, A. P. L, and Gibbon, P. Mon . "Production of proton beams with narrow-band energy spectra from laser-irradiated ultrathin foils". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVE.75.015401.
@article{osti_21072274,
title = {Production of proton beams with narrow-band energy spectra from laser-irradiated ultrathin foils},
author = {Robinson, A. P. L and Gibbon, P.},
abstractNote = {Three-dimensional gridless particle simulations of proton acceleration via irradiation of a very thin foil by a short-pulse, high-intensity laser have been performed to evaluate recently proposed microstructured target configurations. It is found that a pure proton microdot target does not by itself result in a quasimonoenergetic proton beam. Such a beam can only be produced with a very lightly doped target, in qualitative agreement with one-dimensional theory. The simulations suggest that beam quality in current experiments could be dramatically improved by choosing microdot compositions with a 5-10 times lower proton fraction.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVE.75.015401},
journal = {Physical Review. E, Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics},
number = 1,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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