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Title: Numerical study of the thermal ablation of wet solids by ultrashort laser pulses

Abstract

The ablation by ultrashort laser pulses at relatively low fluences (i.e., in the thermal regime) of solids wetted by a thin liquid film is studied using a generic numerical model. In comparison with dry targets, the liquid is found to significantly affect ablation by confining the solid and slowing down the expansion of the laser-heated material. These factors affect the relative efficiency of the various ablation mechanisms, leading, in particular, to the complete inhibition of phase explosion at lower fluences, a reduced ablation yield, and significant changes in the composition of the plume. As a consequence, at fluences above the ablation threshold, the size of the ejected nanoclusters is lower in presence of the liquid. Our results provide a qualitative understanding of the effect of wetting layers on the ablation process.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Departement de Physique et Regroupement Quebecois sur les Materiaux de Pointe (RQMP), Universite de Montreal, Case Postal 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3J7 (Canada)
  2. Laboratoire de Procedes par Laser, Departement de Genie Physique et Regroupement Quebecois sur les Materiaux de Pointe (RQMP), Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Case Postal 6079, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3A7 (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21070003
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics; Journal Volume: 77; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.77.014108; (c) 2008 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ABLATION; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; EFFICIENCY; EXPANSION; EXPLOSIONS; FILMS; LASER RADIATION; LASERS; LAYERS; LIQUIDS; NANOSTRUCTURES; NUMERICAL ANALYSIS; PULSES; SOLIDS; WETTING HEAT

Citation Formats

Perez, Danny, Beland, Laurent Karim, Deryng, Delphine, Lewis, Laurent J., and Meunier, Michel. Numerical study of the thermal ablation of wet solids by ultrashort laser pulses. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.77.014108.
Perez, Danny, Beland, Laurent Karim, Deryng, Delphine, Lewis, Laurent J., & Meunier, Michel. Numerical study of the thermal ablation of wet solids by ultrashort laser pulses. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.77.014108.
Perez, Danny, Beland, Laurent Karim, Deryng, Delphine, Lewis, Laurent J., and Meunier, Michel. 2008. "Numerical study of the thermal ablation of wet solids by ultrashort laser pulses". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.77.014108.
@article{osti_21070003,
title = {Numerical study of the thermal ablation of wet solids by ultrashort laser pulses},
author = {Perez, Danny and Beland, Laurent Karim and Deryng, Delphine and Lewis, Laurent J. and Meunier, Michel},
abstractNote = {The ablation by ultrashort laser pulses at relatively low fluences (i.e., in the thermal regime) of solids wetted by a thin liquid film is studied using a generic numerical model. In comparison with dry targets, the liquid is found to significantly affect ablation by confining the solid and slowing down the expansion of the laser-heated material. These factors affect the relative efficiency of the various ablation mechanisms, leading, in particular, to the complete inhibition of phase explosion at lower fluences, a reduced ablation yield, and significant changes in the composition of the plume. As a consequence, at fluences above the ablation threshold, the size of the ejected nanoclusters is lower in presence of the liquid. Our results provide a qualitative understanding of the effect of wetting layers on the ablation process.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVB.77.014108},
journal = {Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 77,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month = 1
}
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