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Title: Reply to 'Comment on 'Maximal planar networks with large clustering coefficient and power-law degree distribution''

Abstract

We give a brief review on the analytic approaches for finding the degree distribution. The method used in the comment (master-equation) and the one in the original paper (rate-equation) [T. Zhou, G. Yan, and B. H. Wang, Phys. Rev. E 71, 046141 (2005)] are two mainstream methods. The former is more accurate, and the latter is more widely used since it can solve some complicated problems that cannot be easily solved by the former approach. The analytic forms of finding the degree distribution obtained by the above two methods have the same asymptotic behaviors.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei Anhui, 230026 (China)
  2. (China)
  3. Department of Electronic Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei Anhui, 230026 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21069783
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. E, Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics; Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.058102; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ASYMPTOTIC SOLUTIONS; DISTRIBUTION; EQUATIONS; RANDOMNESS; REACTION KINETICS; REVIEWS

Citation Formats

Zhou Tao, Department of Electronic Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei Anhui, 230026, Yan Gang, and Wang Binghong. Reply to 'Comment on 'Maximal planar networks with large clustering coefficient and power-law degree distribution''. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVE.73.058102.
Zhou Tao, Department of Electronic Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei Anhui, 230026, Yan Gang, & Wang Binghong. Reply to 'Comment on 'Maximal planar networks with large clustering coefficient and power-law degree distribution''. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVE.73.058102.
Zhou Tao, Department of Electronic Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei Anhui, 230026, Yan Gang, and Wang Binghong. Mon . "Reply to 'Comment on 'Maximal planar networks with large clustering coefficient and power-law degree distribution''". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVE.73.058102.
@article{osti_21069783,
title = {Reply to 'Comment on 'Maximal planar networks with large clustering coefficient and power-law degree distribution''},
author = {Zhou Tao and Department of Electronic Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei Anhui, 230026 and Yan Gang and Wang Binghong},
abstractNote = {We give a brief review on the analytic approaches for finding the degree distribution. The method used in the comment (master-equation) and the one in the original paper (rate-equation) [T. Zhou, G. Yan, and B. H. Wang, Phys. Rev. E 71, 046141 (2005)] are two mainstream methods. The former is more accurate, and the latter is more widely used since it can solve some complicated problems that cannot be easily solved by the former approach. The analytic forms of finding the degree distribution obtained by the above two methods have the same asymptotic behaviors.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVE.73.058102},
journal = {Physical Review. E, Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics},
number = 5,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Mon May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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