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Title: Inhibition of Sodium Benzoate on Stainless Steel in Tropical Seawater

Abstract

The inhibition of sodium benzoate for stainless steel controlling corrosion was studied in seawater at room temperature. Three sets of sample have been immersed in seawater containing sodium benzoate with the concentrations of 0.3M, 0.6M and 1.0M respectively. One set of sample has been immersed in seawater without adding any sodium benzoate. It was found that the highest corrosion rate was observed for the stainless steel with no inhibitor was added to the seawater. As the concentration of sodium benzoate being increased, the corrosion rate is decreases. Results show that by the addition of 1.0M of sodium benzoate in seawater samples, it giving {>=} 90% efficiencies.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Faculty of Science and Technology, University College of Science and Technology Malaysia (KUSTEM), 21030 Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu Darul Iman (Malaysia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21061702
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 909; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: ICSSST 2006: 2. international conference on solid state science and technology 2006, Kuala Terengganu (Malaysia), 4-6 Sep 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2739853; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CONCENTRATION RATIO; CORROSION; CORROSION PROTECTION; EFFICIENCY; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; SEAWATER; SODIUM COMPOUNDS; STAINLESS STEELS

Citation Formats

Seoh, S. Y., Senin, H. B., Nik, W. N. Wan, and Amin, M. M.. Inhibition of Sodium Benzoate on Stainless Steel in Tropical Seawater. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2739853.
Seoh, S. Y., Senin, H. B., Nik, W. N. Wan, & Amin, M. M.. Inhibition of Sodium Benzoate on Stainless Steel in Tropical Seawater. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2739853.
Seoh, S. Y., Senin, H. B., Nik, W. N. Wan, and Amin, M. M.. Wed . "Inhibition of Sodium Benzoate on Stainless Steel in Tropical Seawater". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2739853.
@article{osti_21061702,
title = {Inhibition of Sodium Benzoate on Stainless Steel in Tropical Seawater},
author = {Seoh, S. Y. and Senin, H. B. and Nik, W. N. Wan and Amin, M. M.},
abstractNote = {The inhibition of sodium benzoate for stainless steel controlling corrosion was studied in seawater at room temperature. Three sets of sample have been immersed in seawater containing sodium benzoate with the concentrations of 0.3M, 0.6M and 1.0M respectively. One set of sample has been immersed in seawater without adding any sodium benzoate. It was found that the highest corrosion rate was observed for the stainless steel with no inhibitor was added to the seawater. As the concentration of sodium benzoate being increased, the corrosion rate is decreases. Results show that by the addition of 1.0M of sodium benzoate in seawater samples, it giving {>=} 90% efficiencies.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2739853},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 909,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed May 09 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed May 09 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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