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Title: Numerical and experimental investigations into Tailored Welded Blanks formability

Abstract

A Tailor welded blank (TWB) technology gives automotive designers the ability to selectively vary body panel thickness and alloy to optimize the use of material. TWBs offer several notable benefits including decreased part weight, reduced manufacturing costs, increased environmental friendliness, and improved dimensional consistency. In order to take advantage of these benefits, however, designers need to overcome the formability of TWBs and be able to accurately predict unique characteristics related to TWB forming early in the design process. In this paper, a numerical model to predict the forming height dome and a specific forming curve of TWBs is presented. Finite element analyses of standard TWB forming tests (Nakazima) were performed in Arcelor Mittal Auto Application Research Center to determine the interaction between the weaker and the stronger materials. To measure the critical strain at necking a numerical method is used. A comparison of numerical and experimental results highlights a good agreement. The numerical approach offers a considerable gain to obtain specific FLC for all configurations.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]; ;  [1];  [4]
  1. Arcelor Research, Automotive Applications (France)
  2. (France)
  3. Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Laboratoire Roberval, UTC/CNRS (France)
  4. Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussees, Ingenierie Mathematiques et Informatiques (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21057371
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 908; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: NUMIFORM '07: 9. international conference on numerical methods in industrial forming processes, Porto (Portugal), 17-21 Jun 2007; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2741015; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ALLOYS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DESIGN; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; GAIN; MANUFACTURING; MATERIALS WORKING; STRAINS

Citation Formats

Gaied, Sadok, Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Laboratoire Roberval, UTC/CNRS, Roelandt, Jean-Marc, Pinard, Fabrice, Schmit, Francis, and Balabane, Mikhael. Numerical and experimental investigations into Tailored Welded Blanks formability. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2741015.
Gaied, Sadok, Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Laboratoire Roberval, UTC/CNRS, Roelandt, Jean-Marc, Pinard, Fabrice, Schmit, Francis, & Balabane, Mikhael. Numerical and experimental investigations into Tailored Welded Blanks formability. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2741015.
Gaied, Sadok, Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Laboratoire Roberval, UTC/CNRS, Roelandt, Jean-Marc, Pinard, Fabrice, Schmit, Francis, and Balabane, Mikhael. Thu . "Numerical and experimental investigations into Tailored Welded Blanks formability". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2741015.
@article{osti_21057371,
title = {Numerical and experimental investigations into Tailored Welded Blanks formability},
author = {Gaied, Sadok and Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Laboratoire Roberval, UTC/CNRS and Roelandt, Jean-Marc and Pinard, Fabrice and Schmit, Francis and Balabane, Mikhael},
abstractNote = {A Tailor welded blank (TWB) technology gives automotive designers the ability to selectively vary body panel thickness and alloy to optimize the use of material. TWBs offer several notable benefits including decreased part weight, reduced manufacturing costs, increased environmental friendliness, and improved dimensional consistency. In order to take advantage of these benefits, however, designers need to overcome the formability of TWBs and be able to accurately predict unique characteristics related to TWB forming early in the design process. In this paper, a numerical model to predict the forming height dome and a specific forming curve of TWBs is presented. Finite element analyses of standard TWB forming tests (Nakazima) were performed in Arcelor Mittal Auto Application Research Center to determine the interaction between the weaker and the stronger materials. To measure the critical strain at necking a numerical method is used. A comparison of numerical and experimental results highlights a good agreement. The numerical approach offers a considerable gain to obtain specific FLC for all configurations.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2741015},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 908,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 17 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu May 17 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Use of laser welded blanks of multiple sheets of material which are referred to as Tailor Welded Blanks (TWB) is one of the current interests for automotive industries as it reduces manufacturing cost, weight of the vehicle and also improves the quality of the component. As the varieties of TWB applications are increasing, the effects of the difference in material properties, surface properties, weld and its orientation on blank formability have become important both in deep-drawing and stretch forming. In this work, formability of two types of TWBs has been studied experimentally by performing out-of-plane stretch forming tests using amore » 101.6 mm diameter hemispherical punch. The materials used in this study were Interstitial-Free (IF) steel sheet samples of different thickness (1.0mm and 1.5 mm) and samples of same thickness (1.5 mm) but with different surface characteristics (galvanized and ungalvanized). In the stretch forming experiments, the limiting dome height (LDH) and strain distribution were measured. The influence of weld orientation with respect to major surface strain on formability was studied by conducting experiments in or close to plane strain condition. It has been found that thickness ratio and difference in properties have significant influence on major and minor strain distributions and weld line movement, but the difference in surface characteristics has a minor effect. The simulations results agreed well with the observations from the experimental work conducted on stretch forming of TWBs.« less
  • Tailor Welded Blanks (TWB) technology is one of the several approaches that have been used to reduce the weight of the automobile body. TWBs are made up of two or more blanks having different/same properties (geometry, material etc.) prior to forming. The formability of these blanks depends on material and geometric parameters like strength ratio and thickness ratio. The study of these blanks can be classified on the basis of the weld orientation chosen viz. transverse weld or longitudinal weld with respect to the major straining direction.This paper studies the formability issues related to transverse TWB by FE simulation. Themore » formability is assessed by analyzing tensile and Limit Dome Height (LDH) tests. The weld region is assumed to be a line in all the simulations. While modeling the tensile test, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation are monitored, and in LDH testing, pole height and maximum load (in near plane strain condition) are monitored. LDH testing shows that as thickness ratio increases, the load bearing capacity and the pole height decreases. There is a contribution from both the thicker and the thinner blank to the overall deforming volume. Failure location analysis shows that there is an abrupt change in the location of the failure from punch nose region to weld line region as the thickness ratio reaches a critical magnitude (1.08).The study of material properties shows that as the yield strength ratio (S ratio) and strain hardening exponent ratio (N ratio) between the blanks increases, the maximum load which the blank can sustain without failure (UTS) increases. This becomes constant and comparable to that of single sheet at higher N and S ratios.« less
  • Hot stamping of quenchenable ultra high strength steels currently represents a promising forming technology for the manufacturing of safety and crash relevant parts. For some applications, such as B-pillars and other structural components that may undergo impact loading, it may be desirable to create regions of the part with tailored mechanical properties. In the paper, a laboratory-scale hot stamped U-channel was manufactured by using a segmented die, which was heated by cartridge heaters and cooled by water channels independently. Local hardness values as low as 289 HV can be achieved using a heated die temperature of 400°C while maintaining amore » hardness level of 490 HV in the fully cooled region. If the die temperature was increased to 450°C, the Vickers hardness of elements in the heated region was 227 HV, with a reduction in hardness of more than 50%. Optical microscopy was used to verify the microstructure of the as-quenched phases with respect to the heated die temperatures. The FE model of the lab-scale process was developed to capture the overall hardness trends that were observed in the experiments.« less
  • The simulation of the forming process of Ti-TWBs at elevated temperatures using finite element analysis to determine the optimum forming conditions of Ti-TWBs is presented in this paper. For verification of the simulation results, titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) was selected for the first instance to prepare the specimen of Ti-TWBs. The thickness combinations of 0.7mm/1.0mm and in widths of 20mm, 90mm and 110mm were used. A specific tooling system with temperature control device was developed to the forming of Ti-TWBs at 550 deg. C. A cylindrical punch of 50mm diameter was designed and manufactured. Different forming parameters (i.e. traveling distance ofmore » the punch and the stroke as well as the time of each forming process) and material characteristics under various temperatures were measured. In addition, the true stress and strain values by tensile test as well as the major and minor strain distributions of forming Ti-TWBs at elevated temperatures by Swift Forming test were carried out and applied as input into the finite element program. The simulation results indentify failure locations and Limit Dome Height (LDH) of Ti-TWBs at elevated temperatures and were compared with the measured ones. Finally, the optimum forming conditions of Ti-TWBs were determined based on the experimentally verified simulation results.« less
  • Both accurate constitutive laws and formability limits of materials are essential for a numerical optimization of sheet forming processes. To identify these behaviors, experimental databases are needed. In this work, experiments are performed from a biaxial device able to give for a unique in-plane specimen a good prediction of rheological parameters and formability. The proposed device is a servo-hydraulic testing machine provided with four independent dynamic actuators. By localizing necking in the central zone of the specimen, the strain path in this zone is controlled by the speed ratio between the two axes and the whole forming limit diagram canmore » be covered. The experimental forming limit curve for the aluminium alloy AA5086 is determined thanks to a rigorous procedure for detecting the onset of necking in the specimen. Material parameters (constants of both hardening law and anisotropic yield criterion) are identified from the global measurement of force versus displacement curves by means of an inverse analysis procedure. Comparison between experimental and numerical forming limit curves are presented. For the numerical FLCs, two sets of material parameters are compared, the former is identified through the classical uniaxial test and the latter thanks to the dedicated cruciform specimen.« less