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Title: Quantum-Gravity Based Photon Dispersion in Gamma-Ray Bursts: The Detection Problem

Abstract

Gamma-ray bursts at cosmological distances offer a time-varying signal that can be used to search for energy-dependent photon dispersion effects. We show that short bursts with narrow pulse structures at high energies will offer the least ambiguous tests for energy-dependent dispersion effects. We discuss quantitative methods to search for such effects in time-tagged photon data. Utilizing observed gamma-ray burst profiles extrapolated to GeV energies, as may expected to be observed by GLAST, we also demonstrate the extent to which these methods can be used as an empirical exploration of quantum gravity formalisms.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Denver Research Institute, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208 (United States)
  2. Space Science Division, NASA/Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21057323
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 906; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: Stockholm symposium on GRB's: Gamma-ray bursts prospects for GLAST, Stockholm (Sweden), 1 Sep 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2737411; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; COSMIC GAMMA BURSTS; COSMIC PHOTONS; COSMOLOGY; DISPERSION RELATIONS; ENERGY DEPENDENCE; GAMMA DETECTION; PROMPT GAMMA RADIATION; QUANTUM GRAVITY; SIGNALS; TELESCOPE COUNTERS

Citation Formats

Norris, Jay P., and Scargle, Jeffrey D. Quantum-Gravity Based Photon Dispersion in Gamma-Ray Bursts: The Detection Problem. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2737411.
Norris, Jay P., & Scargle, Jeffrey D. Quantum-Gravity Based Photon Dispersion in Gamma-Ray Bursts: The Detection Problem. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2737411.
Norris, Jay P., and Scargle, Jeffrey D. Tue . "Quantum-Gravity Based Photon Dispersion in Gamma-Ray Bursts: The Detection Problem". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2737411.
@article{osti_21057323,
title = {Quantum-Gravity Based Photon Dispersion in Gamma-Ray Bursts: The Detection Problem},
author = {Norris, Jay P. and Scargle, Jeffrey D.},
abstractNote = {Gamma-ray bursts at cosmological distances offer a time-varying signal that can be used to search for energy-dependent photon dispersion effects. We show that short bursts with narrow pulse structures at high energies will offer the least ambiguous tests for energy-dependent dispersion effects. We discuss quantitative methods to search for such effects in time-tagged photon data. Utilizing observed gamma-ray burst profiles extrapolated to GeV energies, as may expected to be observed by GLAST, we also demonstrate the extent to which these methods can be used as an empirical exploration of quantum gravity formalisms.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2737411},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 906,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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