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Title: Theory of High Energy Emission in GRBs

Abstract

Gamma-ray bursts are thought to be capable of accelerating cosmic rays up to GZK energies Ep {approx} 1020 eV, leading to a flux at Earth comparable to that observed by large EAS arrays such as AUGER. Both leptonic, e.g. synchrotron and inverse Compton, as well as photomeson processes can lead to GeV-TeV gamma-rays measurable by GLAST, AGILE, or ACTs, providing useful probes of the burst physics and model parameters. Photomeson interactions also produce neutrinos at energies ranging from sub-TeV to EeV, which will be probed with forthcoming experiments such as IceCube, ANITA and KM3NeT. This would provide information about the fundamental interaction physics, the acceleration mechanism, the nature of the sources and their environment.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21057320
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 906; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: Stockholm symposium on GRB's: Gamma-ray bursts prospects for GLAST, Stockholm (Sweden), 1 Sep 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2737405; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ACCELERATION; COSMIC GAMMA BURSTS; COSMIC GAMMA SOURCES; EEV RANGE; GAMMA DETECTION; GAMMA RADIATION; MESONS; NEUTRINOS; PARTICLE IDENTIFICATION; PHOTOPRODUCTION; TELESCOPE COUNTERS; TEV RANGE

Citation Formats

Meszaros, Peter, and Dept. of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802. Theory of High Energy Emission in GRBs. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2737405.
Meszaros, Peter, & Dept. of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802. Theory of High Energy Emission in GRBs. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2737405.
Meszaros, Peter, and Dept. of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802. Tue . "Theory of High Energy Emission in GRBs". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2737405.
@article{osti_21057320,
title = {Theory of High Energy Emission in GRBs},
author = {Meszaros, Peter and Dept. of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802},
abstractNote = {Gamma-ray bursts are thought to be capable of accelerating cosmic rays up to GZK energies Ep {approx} 1020 eV, leading to a flux at Earth comparable to that observed by large EAS arrays such as AUGER. Both leptonic, e.g. synchrotron and inverse Compton, as well as photomeson processes can lead to GeV-TeV gamma-rays measurable by GLAST, AGILE, or ACTs, providing useful probes of the burst physics and model parameters. Photomeson interactions also produce neutrinos at energies ranging from sub-TeV to EeV, which will be probed with forthcoming experiments such as IceCube, ANITA and KM3NeT. This would provide information about the fundamental interaction physics, the acceleration mechanism, the nature of the sources and their environment.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2737405},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 906,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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