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Title: A Field-Portable X-Ray Fluorescence Instrument: Design and Applications

Abstract

The field portable XRF (FPXRF) spectrometer is composed of a measuring head that holds the detector (Si-PIN) and the excitation sources (Cd-109 and Am-241) and the spectrum acquisition system. The application of this system for the analysis of cultural heritage artifacts will be presented and discussed.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Institute of Nuclear Physics, P.O.Box 85, Tirana (Albania)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21057293
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 899; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 6. international conference of the Balkan Physical Union, Istanbul (Turkey), 22-26 Aug 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2733592; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; AMERICIUM 241; CADMIUM 109; DESIGN; EMISSION SPECTRA; EXCITATION; FLUORESCENCE; PORTABLE EQUIPMENT; X RADIATION; X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS; X-RAY SPECTRA; X-RAY SPECTROMETERS

Citation Formats

Civici, Nikolla. A Field-Portable X-Ray Fluorescence Instrument: Design and Applications. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2733592.
Civici, Nikolla. A Field-Portable X-Ray Fluorescence Instrument: Design and Applications. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2733592.
Civici, Nikolla. Mon . "A Field-Portable X-Ray Fluorescence Instrument: Design and Applications". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2733592.
@article{osti_21057293,
title = {A Field-Portable X-Ray Fluorescence Instrument: Design and Applications},
author = {Civici, Nikolla},
abstractNote = {The field portable XRF (FPXRF) spectrometer is composed of a measuring head that holds the detector (Si-PIN) and the excitation sources (Cd-109 and Am-241) and the spectrum acquisition system. The application of this system for the analysis of cultural heritage artifacts will be presented and discussed.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2733592},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 899,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations for worker exposure to lead specify worker protection levels based upon airborne concentrations of lead dust. The rapid, on-site determination of lead in air filter samples using a portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument with an attachment to hold the filter would expedite the exposure assessment process and facilitate compliance with the OSHA standards. A total of 65 lead in air filter samples were collected at bridge blasting lead-abatement projects using closed-faced, 37-mm cassettes with pre-loaded 0.8 micron pore size mixed cellulose ester membrane filters. The lead loading range of the data set wasmore » 0.1--1514.6 micrograms ([micro]g) of lead/sample. Samples were initially analyzed with a field portable XRF (NITON[reg sign] 700) using an experimental non-destructive XRF method. Samples were subsequently analyzed using National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Method 7105 (Graphite Furnace AA) as a reference analytical method. The paired data were not normally distributed; therefore, the non-parametric Wilcoxon signed rank test was used for statistical analysis. There was no statistically significant difference between data from the field portable XRF method and the NIOSH method. Linear regression of the data resulted in a slope of 0.959, a y-intercept of 5.20 [micro]g, and an r[sup 2] of 0.985. The XRF limit of detection and limit of quantitation were determined to be 6.2 and 17 [micro]g of lead/sample, respectively. The XRF method accuracy was [+-]16.4%.« less
  • Lead concentrations in soil are usually determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy and/or inductively coupled plasma (ICP) emission spectroscopy of soil samples. Portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF), when used as a field screening method for lead, offers advantages in time and cost of analysis. Results are available immediately and several measurements can be made in a relatively short period of time, allowing hot spots to be identified. In this study, the usefulness of a commercially available field-portable energy-dispersive XRF spectrometer is evaluated for determining the extent of lead contamination on small-arms firing ranges at a military installation. Data obtained with the XRFmore » unit in the field are compared with data obtained from soil samples analyzed in an analytical laboratory by ICP. Results indicate that the field-portable XRF unit provides data that are useful in determining the extent and relative magnitude of lead contamination.« less
  • A detailed characterization of the underlying and adjacent soils near a chrome plating shop utilized field-portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) as a screening tool. XRF permitted real-time acquisition of estimates for total metal content of soils. A trailer-mounted soil coring unit was used to recover soil samples for XRF analyses. This approach minimized the number of samples required for adequate characterization of the chromium distribution in the soils at the site and permitted immediate delineation of source hot spots. The nondestructive nature of the XRF analyses permitted correlation analysis using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) techniques. Correlation between XRF and ICP wasmore » very good (r[sup 2] = 0.95) but the XRF analyses underestimated the total chromium concentrations, probably because of inappropriate calibration samples.« less