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Title: Sterol Profile for Natural Juices Authentification by GC-MS

Abstract

A GC-MS analytical method is described for some natural juices analysis. The fingerprint of sterols was used to characterize the natural juice. A rapid liquid-liquid extraction method was used. The sterols were separated on a Rtx-5MS capillary column, 15mx0.25mm, 0.25{mu}m film thickness, in a temperature program from 50 deg. C for 1 min, then ramped at 15 deg. C/min to 300 deg. C and held for 15 min. Identification of sterols and their patterns were used for juice characterization. The sterol profile is a useful approach for confirming the presence of juices of orange, grapefruit, pineapple and passion fruit in compounded beverages and for detecting of adulteration of fruit juices.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Faculty of Physics, Babes-Bolyai University of Cluj-Napoca (Romania)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21057273
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 899; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 6. international conference of the Balkan Physical Union, Istanbul (Turkey), 22-26 Aug 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2733495; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; BEVERAGES; CAPILLARIES; FOOD PROCESSING; GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY; GRAPEFRUITS; MASS SPECTROSCOPY; ORANGES; PINEAPPLES; SOLVENT EXTRACTION; STEROLS

Citation Formats

Culea, M. Sterol Profile for Natural Juices Authentification by GC-MS. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2733495.
Culea, M. Sterol Profile for Natural Juices Authentification by GC-MS. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2733495.
Culea, M. Mon . "Sterol Profile for Natural Juices Authentification by GC-MS". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2733495.
@article{osti_21057273,
title = {Sterol Profile for Natural Juices Authentification by GC-MS},
author = {Culea, M.},
abstractNote = {A GC-MS analytical method is described for some natural juices analysis. The fingerprint of sterols was used to characterize the natural juice. A rapid liquid-liquid extraction method was used. The sterols were separated on a Rtx-5MS capillary column, 15mx0.25mm, 0.25{mu}m film thickness, in a temperature program from 50 deg. C for 1 min, then ramped at 15 deg. C/min to 300 deg. C and held for 15 min. Identification of sterols and their patterns were used for juice characterization. The sterol profile is a useful approach for confirming the presence of juices of orange, grapefruit, pineapple and passion fruit in compounded beverages and for detecting of adulteration of fruit juices.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2733495},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 899,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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