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Title: Production of Cu-Al-Ni Shape Memory Alloys by Mechanical Alloy

Abstract

The mechanical alloying technique has been used to produce shape memory Cu83Al13Ni4 alloy. The structure and thermal properties were examined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The morphology of the surface suggests the presence of martensite.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics, Faculty of Art and Science, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaras, 46000 (Turkey)
  2. (Turkey)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21057236
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 899; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 6. international conference of the Balkan Physical Union, Istanbul (Turkey), 22-26 Aug 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2733395; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ALUMINIUM ALLOYS; CALORIMETRY; COPPER ALLOYS; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; DIFFERENTIAL THERMAL ANALYSIS; MARTENSITE; MORPHOLOGY; NICKEL ALLOYS; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SHAPE MEMORY EFFECT; SURFACES; THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES

Citation Formats

Goegebakan, Musa, Soguksu, Ali Kemal, Uzun, Orhan, Dogan, Ali, and Department of Physics, Faculty of Art and Science, GaziOsmanpasa University, Tokat. Production of Cu-Al-Ni Shape Memory Alloys by Mechanical Alloy. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2733395.
Goegebakan, Musa, Soguksu, Ali Kemal, Uzun, Orhan, Dogan, Ali, & Department of Physics, Faculty of Art and Science, GaziOsmanpasa University, Tokat. Production of Cu-Al-Ni Shape Memory Alloys by Mechanical Alloy. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2733395.
Goegebakan, Musa, Soguksu, Ali Kemal, Uzun, Orhan, Dogan, Ali, and Department of Physics, Faculty of Art and Science, GaziOsmanpasa University, Tokat. Mon . "Production of Cu-Al-Ni Shape Memory Alloys by Mechanical Alloy". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2733395.
@article{osti_21057236,
title = {Production of Cu-Al-Ni Shape Memory Alloys by Mechanical Alloy},
author = {Goegebakan, Musa and Soguksu, Ali Kemal and Uzun, Orhan and Dogan, Ali and Department of Physics, Faculty of Art and Science, GaziOsmanpasa University, Tokat},
abstractNote = {The mechanical alloying technique has been used to produce shape memory Cu83Al13Ni4 alloy. The structure and thermal properties were examined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The morphology of the surface suggests the presence of martensite.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2733395},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 899,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • In Cu-11.92 wt.%Al-3.78 wt.%Ni shape memory alloy, the influence of deformation and thermal treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties under the compression test were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Experiments show that the mechanical properties of the alloy can be enhanced by convenient heat treatments. The alloy exhibits good mechanical properties with high ultimate compression strength and ductility after annealing at high temperature. However, it exhibits brittle fracture and dramatic strain hardening, with linear stress-strain behavior after annealing at low temperature. The changes in the mechanical propertiesmore » have been linked to the evolution of the degree of order, occurrence of precipitation, and variation of the grain size. From microstructural observations, it is seen that the {beta}{sub 1}' (18R) and {gamma}{sub 1}' (2H) martensite phases coexist at different fractions in the undeformed and deformed states. Deformation induces the changes between the {beta}{sub 1}' and {gamma}{sub 1}' martensites and deformation-induced martensites form at preferred orientations as mechanical twins. The {beta}{sub 1}' martensite variants are twin-related with respect to the (1-bar 2-bar 8){sub 18R} mirror plane and a new orientation relationship for these twin variants is derived as (1-bar 2-bar 8){sub A}-parallel (1-bar 2-bar 8){sub C}: [4-bar 61] {sub A}-parallel [4-bar 61]{sub C}. Additionally, an increase in the amount of deformation causes martensite reorientation, de-twinning, and dislocation generation; also, the martensite plates are seen to have rearranged in the same orientation to be parallel with each other.« less
  • In the development of an optimized hot-rolling process for a Cu-Al-Ni-Mn alloy, the effects of the recrystallized and transformed texture on ductility and shape memory recovery were examined. The sheet texture of samples rolled in the [beta]-phase region (750 C) was characterized by martensitic (128) poles along the normal direction and (0 0 18) pole inclined 60[degree] from the normal to the rolling direction. The samples rolled in the [alpha] + [beta] region (600 C) exhibited a slightly stronger but less symmetrical sheet texture. The shape memory recovery is more or less isotropic in the rolling plane, relatively independent ofmore » the rolling conditions. However, an improved bending ductility of 9.5% was observed along the rolling direction in specimens rolled at 750 C with a reduction per pass of 27%.« less
  • The heating effects on the structure and fine structure of Cu-11.9Al-5Ni-1.6Mn-1Ti (wt%) shape memory alloy have been studied by means of transmission electron microscopy and microscopic compositional analysis. With the increase of the heating temperature and time, the stabilized M18R{sub 1} martensite, transformed from the parent phase of L2{sub 1} structure type, underwent the following structural variations: M18R{sub 1} {r_arrow} N18R{sub 1} {r_arrow} disorder N9R. Disorder N9R bainite precipitates and retained parent phases were observed in specimens heated at 573 and 623 K for 7.2 ks or longer. When the alloy was heated at 673 K for 133.2 ks, equilibriummore » {alpha}, {gamma}{sub 2} and Ni,Al-rich phases were formed without any retained {beta}{sub 1} parent phase. While the size of the X{sub s} particles decreased in the specimen heated at 623 K for 7.2 ks and they disappeared completely in the specimen heated at 673 K, the X{sub L} particles were coarsened after heating. With the increase of the heating temperature and time the growth of the antiphase domains was observed.« less
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  • The high mobility of austenite-martensite interfaces is a characteristic of a thermoelastic martensitic transformation. Internal friction and elastic constants are very suitable probes to analyze this mobility. In this work, resonant ultrasound spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and neutron powder diffraction have been employed to analyze the role of defects in a first-order transformation. An anomalous behavior associated with the martensitic transformation in a Cu-Al-Ni shape-memory alloy has been observed; the internal friction peak measured during cooling completely disappears on heating. The elastic constants also show different behavior on heating and cooling. The different mobility of defects in the two phases,more » and the simultaneous occurrence of both the defect recovery processes and the martensitic transformation in the same temperature range, are the origin of the observed behavior. These effects show an exceptional influence of defects on thermoelastic equilibrium during a first-order structural transition. The proposed mechanism is general and may apply to other transitions than the one reported in this paper.« less