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Title: Studies of Flow in Ionized Gas: Historical Perspective, Contemporary Experiments, and Applications

Abstract

Since the first observations that a very small ionized fraction (order of 1 ppm) could strongly affect the gas flow, numerous experiments with partially or fully wall-free discharges have demonstrated the dispersion of shock waves, the enhancement of lateral forces in the flow, the prospects of levitation, and other aerodynamic effects with vast potential of application. A review of physical effects and observations are given along with current status of their interpretation. Special attention will be given to the physical problems of energy efficiency in generating wall-free discharges and the phenomenology of filamentary discharges. Comments and case examples are given on the current status of availability of necessary data for modelling and simulation of the aerodynamic phenomena in weakly ionized gas.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21057222
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 899; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 6. international conference of the Balkan Physical Union, Istanbul (Turkey), 22-26 Aug 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2733043; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; AERODYNAMICS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; ELECTRIC DISCHARGES; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; GAS FLOW; IONIZATION; LEVITATION; PLASMA; SHOCK WAVES

Citation Formats

Popovic, S., and Vuskovic, L. Studies of Flow in Ionized Gas: Historical Perspective, Contemporary Experiments, and Applications. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2733043.
Popovic, S., & Vuskovic, L. Studies of Flow in Ionized Gas: Historical Perspective, Contemporary Experiments, and Applications. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2733043.
Popovic, S., and Vuskovic, L. Mon . "Studies of Flow in Ionized Gas: Historical Perspective, Contemporary Experiments, and Applications". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2733043.
@article{osti_21057222,
title = {Studies of Flow in Ionized Gas: Historical Perspective, Contemporary Experiments, and Applications},
author = {Popovic, S. and Vuskovic, L.},
abstractNote = {Since the first observations that a very small ionized fraction (order of 1 ppm) could strongly affect the gas flow, numerous experiments with partially or fully wall-free discharges have demonstrated the dispersion of shock waves, the enhancement of lateral forces in the flow, the prospects of levitation, and other aerodynamic effects with vast potential of application. A review of physical effects and observations are given along with current status of their interpretation. Special attention will be given to the physical problems of energy efficiency in generating wall-free discharges and the phenomenology of filamentary discharges. Comments and case examples are given on the current status of availability of necessary data for modelling and simulation of the aerodynamic phenomena in weakly ionized gas.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2733043},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 899,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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  • No abstract prepared.