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Title: Cosmic-ray Muon Flux In Belgrade

Abstract

Two identical plastic scintillator detectors, of prismatic shape (50x23x5)cm similar to NE102, were used for continuous monitoring of cosmic-ray intensity. Muon {delta}E spectra have been taken at five minute intervals, simultaneously from the detector situated on the ground level and from the second one at the depth of 25 m.w.e in the low-level underground laboratory. Sum of all the spectra for the years 2002-2004 has been used to determine the cosmic-ray muon flux at the ground level and in the underground laboratory.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)
  2. Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21057201
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 899; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 6. international conference of the Balkan Physical Union, Istanbul (Turkey), 22-26 Aug 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2733284; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; COSMIC MUONS; COSMIC RAY DETECTION; ENERGY SPECTRA; GROUND LEVEL; MUON DETECTION; PLASTIC SCINTILLATORS; SERBIA; SOLID SCINTILLATION DETECTORS; UNDERGROUND

Citation Formats

Banjanac, R., Dragic, A., Jokovic, D., Udovicic, V., Puzovic, J., and Anicin, I.. Cosmic-ray Muon Flux In Belgrade. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2733284.
Banjanac, R., Dragic, A., Jokovic, D., Udovicic, V., Puzovic, J., & Anicin, I.. Cosmic-ray Muon Flux In Belgrade. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2733284.
Banjanac, R., Dragic, A., Jokovic, D., Udovicic, V., Puzovic, J., and Anicin, I.. Mon . "Cosmic-ray Muon Flux In Belgrade". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2733284.
@article{osti_21057201,
title = {Cosmic-ray Muon Flux In Belgrade},
author = {Banjanac, R. and Dragic, A. and Jokovic, D. and Udovicic, V. and Puzovic, J. and Anicin, I.},
abstractNote = {Two identical plastic scintillator detectors, of prismatic shape (50x23x5)cm similar to NE102, were used for continuous monitoring of cosmic-ray intensity. Muon {delta}E spectra have been taken at five minute intervals, simultaneously from the detector situated on the ground level and from the second one at the depth of 25 m.w.e in the low-level underground laboratory. Sum of all the spectra for the years 2002-2004 has been used to determine the cosmic-ray muon flux at the ground level and in the underground laboratory.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2733284},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 899,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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