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Title: New Materials Design Through Friction Stir Processing Techniques

Abstract

Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has reached a large interest in the scientific community and in the last years also in the industrial environment, due to the advantages of such solid state welding process with respect to the classic ones. The complex material flow occurring during the process plays a fundamental role in such solid state welding process, since it determines dramatic changes in the material microstructure of the so called weld nugget, which affects the effectiveness of the joints. What is more, Friction Stir Processing (FSP) is mainly being considered for producing high-strain-rate-superplastic (HSRS) microstructure in commercial aluminum alloys. The aim of the present research is the development of a locally composite material through the Friction Stir Processing (FSP) of two AA7075-T6 blanks and a different material insert. The results of a preliminary experimental campaign, carried out at the varying of the additional material placed at the sheets interface under different conditions, are presented. Micro and macro observation of the such obtained joints permitted to investigate the effects of such process on the overall joint performance.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Dipartimento di Tecnologia Meccanica, Produzione e Ingegneria Gestionale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze 90128 Palermo (Italy)
  2. Ohio State University, Department of Industrial, Welding and Systems Engineering, 1971 Neil Avenue, 210 Baker Systems, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21057080
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 907; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 10. ESAFORM conference on material forming, Zaragoza (Spain), 18-20 Apr 2007; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2729603; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ALUMINIUM ALLOYS; COMPOSITE MATERIALS; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; DESIGN; FRICTION; INTERFACES; MICROSTRUCTURE; PERFORMANCE; PROCESSING; SHEETS; SOLIDS; STRAIN RATE; WELDED JOINTS; WELDING

Citation Formats

Buffa, G., Fratini, L., and Shivpuri, R. New Materials Design Through Friction Stir Processing Techniques. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2729603.
Buffa, G., Fratini, L., & Shivpuri, R. New Materials Design Through Friction Stir Processing Techniques. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2729603.
Buffa, G., Fratini, L., and Shivpuri, R. Sat . "New Materials Design Through Friction Stir Processing Techniques". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2729603.
@article{osti_21057080,
title = {New Materials Design Through Friction Stir Processing Techniques},
author = {Buffa, G. and Fratini, L. and Shivpuri, R.},
abstractNote = {Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has reached a large interest in the scientific community and in the last years also in the industrial environment, due to the advantages of such solid state welding process with respect to the classic ones. The complex material flow occurring during the process plays a fundamental role in such solid state welding process, since it determines dramatic changes in the material microstructure of the so called weld nugget, which affects the effectiveness of the joints. What is more, Friction Stir Processing (FSP) is mainly being considered for producing high-strain-rate-superplastic (HSRS) microstructure in commercial aluminum alloys. The aim of the present research is the development of a locally composite material through the Friction Stir Processing (FSP) of two AA7075-T6 blanks and a different material insert. The results of a preliminary experimental campaign, carried out at the varying of the additional material placed at the sheets interface under different conditions, are presented. Micro and macro observation of the such obtained joints permitted to investigate the effects of such process on the overall joint performance.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2729603},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 907,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 07 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sat Apr 07 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Friction stir processing involves severe plastic flow within the material; the nature of this flow determines the final morphology of the weld, the resulting microstructures, and the presence or absence of defects such as internal cavities or "wormholes." The forces causing this plastic flow are a function of process parameters, including spindle speed, travel speed, and tool design and angle. Some of these forces are directly applied or a result of the mechanical constraints and compliance of the apparatus, while others are resolved forces resulting from an interaction of these applied forces and tool forces governed by processing parameters, andmore » can be diminished or even reversed in sign with appropriate choices of process parameters. The present investigation is concerned mostly with the friction stir processing of 6061-T6 aluminum plates in a low-cost apparatus built from a commercial milling machine. A rotating dynamometer allows in-process measurement of actual spindle speed, torque, and forces in the x-, y-, and z-directions, as well as force control on these axes. Two main types of tool, both unthreaded, were used. The first had a pin about 4 mm in diameter and 4 mm in length, with a shoulder about 10 mm in diameter, and produced wormhole defects; the second, with a tapered pin about 5 mm long, a base diameter of about 6 mm, a tip diameter of about 4 mm, and a shoulder diameter (flat or dished) of about 19 mm, produced sound welds over a wide range of parameters.« less
  • This presentation describes the design, fabrication and testing of a friction stir processing machine. The machine is intended to be a flexible research tool for a broad range of friction stir processing studies. The machine design also addresses the need for an affordable, robust design for general laboratory use.
  • A fine-grained Al–Mg/Al{sub 3}Ti nanocomposite was fabricated by friction stir processing (FSP) of an aluminum-magnesium (AA5052) alloy with pre-placed titanium powder in the stirred zone. Microstructural evolutions and formation of intermetallic phases were analyzed by optical and electron microscopic techniques across the thickness section of the processed sheets. The microstructure of the nanocomposite consisted of a fine-grained aluminum matrix (1.5 µm), un-reacted titanium particles (<40 µm) and reinforcement particles of Al{sub 3}Ti (<100 nm) and Mg{sub 2}Si (<100 nm). Detailed microstructural analysis indicated solid-state interfacial reactions between the aluminum matrix and micro-sized titanium particles to form Al{sub 3}Ti intermetallic phase.more » The hard inclusions were then fractured and re-distributed in the metal matrix by the severe thermo-mechanical conditions imposed by FSP. Evaluation of mechanical properties by hardness measurement and uniaxial tensile test determined significant enhancement in the mechanical strength (by 2.5 order of magnetite) with a high ductility (~22%). Based on a dislocation-based model analysis, it was suggested that the strength enhancement was governed by grain refinement and the presence of hard inclusions (4 vol%) in the metal matrix. Fractographic studies also showed a ductile-brittle fracture mode for the nanocomposite compared with fully ductile rupture of the annealed alloy as well as the FSPed specimen without pre-placing titanium particles. - Highlights: • FSP was employed to fabricate in situ nanocomposite. • The AA5052 Al alloy with pre-placed micro-sized Ti particles were utilized. • The structural analysis was revealed that the in situ formation of Al{sub 3}Ti nanophase. • The SZ grain structure was refined by PSN and ZHP mechanisms during DRX. • Hardness and tensile strength were improved up to ~2.5 times with a good ductility.« less
  • The main aim of this study is to produce copper reinforced metal matrix composite (MMC) layers using micron sized SiC particles via friction stir processing (FSP) in order to enhance surface mechanical properties. Microstructural evaluation using optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that an increase in traverse speed and a decrease in rotational speed cause a reduction in the grain size of stir zone (SZ) for the specimens friction stir processed (FSPed) without SiC particles. With the aim of determining the optimum processing parameters, the effect of traverse speed as the main processing variable on microstructure andmore » microhardness of MMC layers was investigated. Higher traverse speeds resulted in poor dispersion of SiC particles and consequently reduced the microhardness values of MMC layers. It was found that upon addition of SiC particles, wear properties were improved. This behavior was further supported by SEM images of wear surfaces. Results demonstrated that the microcomposite produced by FSP exhibited enhanced wear resistance and higher average friction coefficient in comparison with pure copper. Tensile properties and fracture characteristics of the specimens FSPed with and without SiC particles and pure copper were also evaluated. According to the results, the MMC layer produced by FSP showed lower strength and elongation than pure copper while a remarkable elongation was observed for FSPed specimen without SiC particles. Research Highlights: {yields} Decrease in traverse speed leads to good dispersion of SiC particles in composites. {yields} No distinct TMAZ in side regions of SZ of FSPed specimens with SiC particles. {yields} Microhardness of FSPed specimens with SiC particles shows a remarkable increase. {yields} Reinforcement of Cu with SiC particles improves wear and friction behavior of surface. {yields} A weak bonding in tensile due to probable agglomeration for SiC containing samples.« less
  • Application of the latest developments in materials technology may greatly aid in the successful pursuit of next generation reactor and transmutation technologies. One such area where significant progress is needed is joining of advanced fuels and materials. Rotary friction welding, also referred to as friction stir welding (FSW), has shown great promise as a method for joining traditionally difficult to join materials such as aluminum alloys. This relatively new technology, first developed in 1991, has more recently been applied to higher melting temperature alloys such as steels, nickel-based and titanium alloys. An overview of the FSW technology is provided andmore » two specific nuclear fuels and materials applications where the technique may be used to overcome limitations of conventional joining technologies are highlighted.« less