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Title: Manufacturing of Profiles for Lightweight Structures

Abstract

The paper shows some investigation results about the production of straight and curved lightweight profiles for lightweight structures and presents their benefits as well as their manufacturing potential for present and future lightweight construction. A strong emphasis is placed on the manufacturing of straight and bent profiles by means of sheet metal bending of innovative products, such as tailor rolled blanks and tailored tubes, and the manufacturing of straight and curved profiles by the innovative procedures curved profile extrusion and composite extrusion, developed at the Institute of Forming Technology and Lightweight Construction (IUL) of the University of Dortmund.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Institute of Forming Technology and Lightweight Construction (IUL), University of Dortmund, Baroper Str. 301, D-44227 Dortmund (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21057060
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 907; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 10. ESAFORM conference on material forming, Zaragoza (Spain), 18-20 Apr 2007; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2729576; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ALLOYS; BENDING; BUILDING MATERIALS; EXTRUSION; MANUFACTURING; METALS; SHEETS; TUBES

Citation Formats

Chatti, Sami, and Kleiner, Matthias. Manufacturing of Profiles for Lightweight Structures. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2729576.
Chatti, Sami, & Kleiner, Matthias. Manufacturing of Profiles for Lightweight Structures. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2729576.
Chatti, Sami, and Kleiner, Matthias. Sat . "Manufacturing of Profiles for Lightweight Structures". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2729576.
@article{osti_21057060,
title = {Manufacturing of Profiles for Lightweight Structures},
author = {Chatti, Sami and Kleiner, Matthias},
abstractNote = {The paper shows some investigation results about the production of straight and curved lightweight profiles for lightweight structures and presents their benefits as well as their manufacturing potential for present and future lightweight construction. A strong emphasis is placed on the manufacturing of straight and bent profiles by means of sheet metal bending of innovative products, such as tailor rolled blanks and tailored tubes, and the manufacturing of straight and curved profiles by the innovative procedures curved profile extrusion and composite extrusion, developed at the Institute of Forming Technology and Lightweight Construction (IUL) of the University of Dortmund.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2729576},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 907,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 07 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sat Apr 07 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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