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Title: Ductile Damage Evolution and Strain Path Dependency

Abstract

Forming limit diagrams are commonly used in sheet metal industry to define the safe forming regions. These diagrams are built to define the necking strains of sheet metals. However, with the rise in the popularity of advance high strength steels, ductile fracture through damage evolution has also emerged as an important parameter in the determination of limit strains. In this work, damage evolution in two different steels used in the automotive industry is examined to observe the relationship between damage evolution and the strain path that is followed during the forming operation.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ;  [3]; ;  [4]
  1. Netherlands Institute for Metals Research (NIMR), PO Box 5008, 2600GA, Delft (Netherlands)
  2. (Netherlands)
  3. Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, PO Box 513, 5600MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands)
  4. Corus Research Development and Technology, PO Box 10000, 1970 CA IJmuiden (Netherlands)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21057008
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 907; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 10. ESAFORM conference on material forming, Zaragoza (Spain), 18-20 Apr 2007; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2729509; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; FRACTURES; MACHINING; MATERIALS WORKING; METALS; SHEETS; STEELS; STRAINS

Citation Formats

Tasan, C. C., Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, PO Box 513, 5600MB, Eindhoven, Hoefnagels, J. M. P., Peerlings, R. H. J., Geers, M. G. D., ten Horn, C. H. L. J., and Vegter, H. Ductile Damage Evolution and Strain Path Dependency. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2729509.
Tasan, C. C., Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, PO Box 513, 5600MB, Eindhoven, Hoefnagels, J. M. P., Peerlings, R. H. J., Geers, M. G. D., ten Horn, C. H. L. J., & Vegter, H. Ductile Damage Evolution and Strain Path Dependency. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2729509.
Tasan, C. C., Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, PO Box 513, 5600MB, Eindhoven, Hoefnagels, J. M. P., Peerlings, R. H. J., Geers, M. G. D., ten Horn, C. H. L. J., and Vegter, H. Sat . "Ductile Damage Evolution and Strain Path Dependency". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2729509.
@article{osti_21057008,
title = {Ductile Damage Evolution and Strain Path Dependency},
author = {Tasan, C. C. and Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, PO Box 513, 5600MB, Eindhoven and Hoefnagels, J. M. P. and Peerlings, R. H. J. and Geers, M. G. D. and ten Horn, C. H. L. J. and Vegter, H.},
abstractNote = {Forming limit diagrams are commonly used in sheet metal industry to define the safe forming regions. These diagrams are built to define the necking strains of sheet metals. However, with the rise in the popularity of advance high strength steels, ductile fracture through damage evolution has also emerged as an important parameter in the determination of limit strains. In this work, damage evolution in two different steels used in the automotive industry is examined to observe the relationship between damage evolution and the strain path that is followed during the forming operation.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2729509},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 907,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 07 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sat Apr 07 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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