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Title: Calcium Oxalate Stones Are Frequently Found Attached to Randall's Plaque

Abstract

The exact mechanisms of the crystallization processes that occur during the formation of calcium oxalate calculi are controversial. Over six decades ago, Alexander Randall reported on a series of cadaveric renal units in which he observed calcium salt deposits on the tips of the renal papilla. Randall hypothesized that these deposits, eponymously termed Randall's plaque, would be the ideal site for stone formation, and indeed in a number of specimens he noted small stones attached to the papillae. With the recent advent of digital endoscopic imaging and micro computerized tomography (CT) technology, it is now possible to inspect the renal papilla of living, human stone formers and to study the attached stone with greater scrutiny.

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 4940 Eastern Ave / Room A 345, Baltimore, Maryland 21224 (United States)
  2. Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 635 Barnhill Dr /MS 5035, Indianapolis, Indiana, 46202 (United States)
  3. Methodist Hospital Institute for Kidney Stone Disease, 1801 N. Senate Blvd, Suite 220, Indianapolis, Indiana, 46202 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21056959
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 900; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 1. Annual international urolithiasis research symposium, Indianapolis, IN (United States), 2-3 Nov 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2723557; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CALCIUM COMPOUNDS; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CRYSTALLIZATION; DISEASES; IMAGES; KIDNEYS; OXALATES; X-RAY RADIOGRAPHY

Citation Formats

Matlaga, Brian R., Williams, James C. Jr., Evan, Andrew P., and Lingeman, James E.. Calcium Oxalate Stones Are Frequently Found Attached to Randall's Plaque. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2723557.
Matlaga, Brian R., Williams, James C. Jr., Evan, Andrew P., & Lingeman, James E.. Calcium Oxalate Stones Are Frequently Found Attached to Randall's Plaque. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2723557.
Matlaga, Brian R., Williams, James C. Jr., Evan, Andrew P., and Lingeman, James E.. Thu . "Calcium Oxalate Stones Are Frequently Found Attached to Randall's Plaque". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2723557.
@article{osti_21056959,
title = {Calcium Oxalate Stones Are Frequently Found Attached to Randall's Plaque},
author = {Matlaga, Brian R. and Williams, James C. Jr. and Evan, Andrew P. and Lingeman, James E.},
abstractNote = {The exact mechanisms of the crystallization processes that occur during the formation of calcium oxalate calculi are controversial. Over six decades ago, Alexander Randall reported on a series of cadaveric renal units in which he observed calcium salt deposits on the tips of the renal papilla. Randall hypothesized that these deposits, eponymously termed Randall's plaque, would be the ideal site for stone formation, and indeed in a number of specimens he noted small stones attached to the papillae. With the recent advent of digital endoscopic imaging and micro computerized tomography (CT) technology, it is now possible to inspect the renal papilla of living, human stone formers and to study the attached stone with greater scrutiny.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2723557},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 900,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 05 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Apr 05 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}