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Title: X-ray System for Early Diagnosis of Breast Cancer

Abstract

Increasing rate of breast cancer in Japan is enormous in these years. Nevertheless only 2-3 % of female may receive mammography. In order to improve this number for early detection of breast cancer we have started development of a refraction-based visualization of breast cancer. This system comprises two types of imaging: one is for a regular annual or biyearly check of the breast cancer. This is a 2-D mode x-ray dark-field imaging where a Laue transmission type of angle analyzer with thickness of 2.124 mm is used for the FOV of 90 mm x 90 mm that can provide the spatial resolution better than 50 microns; the other a 3-D reconstruction for further detailed check to specify type and location of breast cancer.

Authors:
 [1]; ; ;  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8]
  1. DDS Center, Institute of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Yamasaki 2641, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)
  2. Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)
  3. Department of Pathology, National Nagoya Hospital, Sannomaru 4-1-1, Nakaku, Nagoya 460-0001 (Japan)
  4. Department of Radiology, National Nagoya Hospital, Sannomaru 4-1-1, Nakaku, Nagoya 460-0001 (Japan)
  5. Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)
  6. Department of Life System Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Yamagata University, Jonan 4-3-16, Yonezawa, Yamagata 992-8510 (Japan)
  7. Department of Photo-Science, GUAS, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)
  8. BSRF, IHEP, CAS, Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918, 100039 Beijing (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21056946
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 902; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 2. international symposium on portable synchrotron light sources and advanced applications, Shiga (Japan), 15-17 Jan 2007; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2723617; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; DETECTION; DIAGNOSIS; FEMALES; IMAGES; JAPAN; LAUE METHOD; MAMMARY GLANDS; NEOPLASMS; REFRACTION; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; X RADIATION; X-RAY RADIOGRAPHY

Citation Formats

Ando, M., Maksimenko, A., Sugiyama, H., Hyodo, K., Ichihara, S., Endo, T., Moriyama, N., Yuasa, T., Hashimoto, E., and Li, G. X-ray System for Early Diagnosis of Breast Cancer. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2723617.
Ando, M., Maksimenko, A., Sugiyama, H., Hyodo, K., Ichihara, S., Endo, T., Moriyama, N., Yuasa, T., Hashimoto, E., & Li, G. X-ray System for Early Diagnosis of Breast Cancer. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2723617.
Ando, M., Maksimenko, A., Sugiyama, H., Hyodo, K., Ichihara, S., Endo, T., Moriyama, N., Yuasa, T., Hashimoto, E., and Li, G. Fri . "X-ray System for Early Diagnosis of Breast Cancer". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2723617.
@article{osti_21056946,
title = {X-ray System for Early Diagnosis of Breast Cancer},
author = {Ando, M. and Maksimenko, A. and Sugiyama, H. and Hyodo, K. and Ichihara, S. and Endo, T. and Moriyama, N. and Yuasa, T. and Hashimoto, E. and Li, G.},
abstractNote = {Increasing rate of breast cancer in Japan is enormous in these years. Nevertheless only 2-3 % of female may receive mammography. In order to improve this number for early detection of breast cancer we have started development of a refraction-based visualization of breast cancer. This system comprises two types of imaging: one is for a regular annual or biyearly check of the breast cancer. This is a 2-D mode x-ray dark-field imaging where a Laue transmission type of angle analyzer with thickness of 2.124 mm is used for the FOV of 90 mm x 90 mm that can provide the spatial resolution better than 50 microns; the other a 3-D reconstruction for further detailed check to specify type and location of breast cancer.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2723617},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 902,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • This article has attempted to describe the present status of efforts toward routine detection of breast cancer at a stage when it is readily curable and to point out, not only the potentials of screening programs, but also the problems and difficulties that beset them. We believe that efficient, safe screening and accurate early diagnosis are achievable and that trial directed toward this end should not only continue but expand. We see no other avenue that offers as bright a prospect for a meaningful reduction in breast cancer mortality and the monstrous toll--medical, emotional, sociologic and monetary--it exacts.
  • Purpose: The significance of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) associated with invasive breast cancer in patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy (BCT) remains controversial. We examined the impact of the presence and extent of LCIS associated with invasive breast cancer on clinical outcome in BCT patients. Methods and Materials: From 1980 to 1996, 607 cases of invasive breast cancer were treated with BCT. All slides were reviewed by a single pathologist. Positive margin was defined as presence of invasive carcinoma/ductal carcinoma in situ at the inked margin. Multiple clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related variables were analyzed for their association with ipsilateral breast tumormore » recurrence (IBTR) and true recurrence/marginal miss (TR/MM). Median follow-up was 8.7 years. Results: Fifty-six patients (9%) had LCIS in association with invasive cancer. On univariate analysis, positive final margin, positive/no reexcision, smaller maximum specimen dimension, and the presence of LCIS predicted for IBTR. The 10-year IBTR rate was 14% for cases with LCIS vs. 7% without LCIS (p = 0.04). On multivariate analysis, positive margin (p < 0.01), positive/no reexcision (p = 0.04), and presence of LCIS (p = 0.02) remained independently associated with IBTR; positive margin (p < 0.01) and LCIS (p = 0.04) were also associated with TR/MM failure. When examining only cases with negative final margins, the presence of LCIS remained associated with higher IBTR and TR/MM rates (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The presence of LCIS was independently associated with higher rate of IBTR and TR/MM after BCT for invasive breast cancer. LCIS may have significant premalignant potential and progress to an invasive IBTR at the site of index lesion. The adequacy of excision of LCIS associated with invasive carcinoma should be considered in patients undergoing BCT.« less
  • Purpose: To present a retrospective multi-institutional experience of patients treated with the MammoSite radiation therapy system (RTS). Methods and Materials: Nine institutions participated in a pooled analysis of data evaluating the clinical experience of the MammoSite RTS for delivering accelerated partial breast irradiation. Between 2000 and 2004, 483 patients were treated with the MammoSite RTS to 34 Gy delivered in 10 fractions. Treatment parameters were analyzed to identify factors affecting outcome. Results: Median follow-up was 24 months (minimum of 1 year). Overall, infection was documented in 9% of patients, but the rate was only 4.8% if the catheter was placedmore » after lumpectomy. Six patients (1.2%) experienced an in-breast failure; four failures occurred remote from the lumpectomy site (elsewhere failure). Cosmetic results were good/excellent in 91% of patients. Treatment parameters identified as significant on univariate analysis were tested in multivariate regression analysis. The closed-cavity placement technique significantly reduced the risk of infection (p = 0.0267). A skin spacing of <6 mm increased the risk of severe acute skin reaction (p 0.0178) and telangiectasia (p = 0.0280). The use of prophylactic antibiotics reduced the risk of severe acute skin reaction (p < 0.0001). The use of multiple dwell positions reduced the risk of severe hyperpigmentation (p 0.0278). Infection was associated with an increased risk of fair or poor overall cosmesis (p = 0.0009). Conclusions: In this series of patients, the MammoSite RTS seems to have acceptable toxicity rates and cosmetic outcomes, comparable to those with whole-breast radiotherapy. On the basis of these data, the closed-cavity placement technique, use of prophylactic antibiotics, use of multiple dwell positions, and a minimum skin spacing of 6 mm seem to improve patient outcome.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • Purpose: To assess, if and for whom, there are cost savings associated with alternate breast radiotherapy (RT) techniques when compared with the conventional external beam-based whole-breast RT with a boost (WBRT-B). Methods and Materials: Treatment planning and delivery utilization data were modeled for eight different breast RT techniques: (1) WBRT-B: 60 Gy in 30 fractions; (2) WBRT: 50 Gy in 25 fractions; (3) WBRT-accelerated (AC): 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions; (4) WBRT-intensity-modulated RT (IMRT): 60 Gy in 30 fractions; (5) accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI)-IC, MammoSite: 34 Gy in 10 twice-daily fractions; (6) APBI-IT, HDR interstitial: 34 Gy in 10more » twice-daily fractions; (7) APBI three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT): 38.5 Gy in 10 twice-daily fractions; or (8) APBI-IMRT: 38.5 Gy in 10 twice-daily fractions. Costs incurred by payer (i.e., direct medical costs; 2003 Medicare Fee Schedule) and patient (i.e., direct nonmedical costs; time and travel) were estimated. Total societal costs were then calculated for each treatment approach. Results: Not all efforts to reduce overall treatment time result in total cost savings. The least expensive partial breast-based RT approaches were the external beam techniques (APBI-3D-CRT, APBI-IMRT). Any reduced cost to patients for the HDR brachytherapy-based APBI regimens were overshadowed by substantial increases in cost to payers, resulting in higher total societal costs; the cost of HDR treatment delivery was primarily responsible for the increased direct medical cost. For the whole breast-based RT approaches, treating without a boost (WBRT) or with WBRT-AC reduced total costs. Overall, WBRT-AC was the least costly of all the regimens, in terms of costs to society; APBI approaches, in general, were favored over whole-breast techniques when only considering costs to patients. Conclusions: Based on societal cost considerations, WBRT-AC appears to be the preferred approach. If one were to pursue a partial-breast RT regimen to minimize patient costs, it would be more advantageous from a societal perspective to pursue external beam-based approaches such as APBI-3D-CRT or APBI-IMRT in lieu of the brachytherapy-based regimens.« less