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Title: Atomic Physics in ITER - The Foundation for the Next Step to Fusion Power

Abstract

ITER represents the next step towards practical magnetic confinement fusion power. Its primary physics objective is to study plasmas in which the fusion power exceeds the external heating power by a factor of 5 to 10; its technological objectives include the use of superconducting magnets and remote maintenance. We will describe the ITER experiment and then detail the fundamental roles that will be played by atomic physics processes in facilitating the achievement of ITER's objectives. First, atoms and molecules generated by the interaction of the ITER plasma with surrounding material surfaces will impact and, in some respects, dominate the particle, momentum, and energy balances in both the adjacent and confined, core plasmas. Second, impurity radiation in the edge plasma, either from intrinsic or extrinsic species, will ensure that heat coming out from the core is spread more uniformly over the surrounding material surfaces than it would otherwise. Third, many of the diagnostics used to monitor the dense (ne {approx} 1020 m-3), hot ({approx} 1 x 108 K) core plasma leverage off of atomic physics effects.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P. O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543-0451 (United States)
  2. Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21056932
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 901; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: ICAMDATA: 5. international conference on atomic and molecular data and their applications, Meudon (France), 15-19 Oct 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2727360; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; ATOM COLLISIONS; ELECTRON COLLISIONS; ELECTRON DENSITY; ELECTRON TEMPERATURE; HOT PLASMA; ION COLLISIONS; ITER TOKAMAK; MAGNETIC CONFINEMENT; MOLECULE COLLISIONS; PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS; PLASMA HEATING; PLASMA IMPURITIES; SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS

Citation Formats

Stotler, D. P., Bell, R. E., Hill, K. W., Johnson, D. W., and Levinton, F. M.. Atomic Physics in ITER - The Foundation for the Next Step to Fusion Power. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2727360.
Stotler, D. P., Bell, R. E., Hill, K. W., Johnson, D. W., & Levinton, F. M.. Atomic Physics in ITER - The Foundation for the Next Step to Fusion Power. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2727360.
Stotler, D. P., Bell, R. E., Hill, K. W., Johnson, D. W., and Levinton, F. M.. Fri . "Atomic Physics in ITER - The Foundation for the Next Step to Fusion Power". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2727360.
@article{osti_21056932,
title = {Atomic Physics in ITER - The Foundation for the Next Step to Fusion Power},
author = {Stotler, D. P. and Bell, R. E. and Hill, K. W. and Johnson, D. W. and Levinton, F. M.},
abstractNote = {ITER represents the next step towards practical magnetic confinement fusion power. Its primary physics objective is to study plasmas in which the fusion power exceeds the external heating power by a factor of 5 to 10; its technological objectives include the use of superconducting magnets and remote maintenance. We will describe the ITER experiment and then detail the fundamental roles that will be played by atomic physics processes in facilitating the achievement of ITER's objectives. First, atoms and molecules generated by the interaction of the ITER plasma with surrounding material surfaces will impact and, in some respects, dominate the particle, momentum, and energy balances in both the adjacent and confined, core plasmas. Second, impurity radiation in the edge plasma, either from intrinsic or extrinsic species, will ensure that heat coming out from the core is spread more uniformly over the surrounding material surfaces than it would otherwise. Third, many of the diagnostics used to monitor the dense (ne {approx} 1020 m-3), hot ({approx} 1 x 108 K) core plasma leverage off of atomic physics effects.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2727360},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 901,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 06 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Apr 06 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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