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Title: Probing universe with fast neutrons

Abstract

Fast neutrons play crucial roles as a probe to trace the history of the universe. The present paper describes our recent work on the measurement of the neutron capture and neutron inelastic scattering cross sections of various nuclei from primordial and stellar nucleostyntheses point of view, which have been carried out by developing a high sensitive measurement system. The obtained results are compared to previous works and theoretical calculations.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21056753
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 891; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 6. Symposium on nuclear physics, Tours (France), 5-8 Sep 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2713529; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; CAPTURE; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COSMOLOGY; CROSS SECTIONS; FAST NEUTRONS; INELASTIC SCATTERING; NEUTRON REACTIONS; NUCLEI; NUCLEOSYNTHESIS; PROBES; UNIVERSE

Citation Formats

Nagai, Y., Shima, T., Tomyo, A., Segawa, M., Temma, Y., Ohsaki, T., Igashira, M., and Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8552. Probing universe with fast neutrons. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2713529.
Nagai, Y., Shima, T., Tomyo, A., Segawa, M., Temma, Y., Ohsaki, T., Igashira, M., & Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8552. Probing universe with fast neutrons. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2713529.
Nagai, Y., Shima, T., Tomyo, A., Segawa, M., Temma, Y., Ohsaki, T., Igashira, M., and Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8552. Mon . "Probing universe with fast neutrons". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2713529.
@article{osti_21056753,
title = {Probing universe with fast neutrons},
author = {Nagai, Y. and Shima, T. and Tomyo, A. and Segawa, M. and Temma, Y. and Ohsaki, T. and Igashira, M. and Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8552},
abstractNote = {Fast neutrons play crucial roles as a probe to trace the history of the universe. The present paper describes our recent work on the measurement of the neutron capture and neutron inelastic scattering cross sections of various nuclei from primordial and stellar nucleostyntheses point of view, which have been carried out by developing a high sensitive measurement system. The obtained results are compared to previous works and theoretical calculations.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2713529},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 891,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 26 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Feb 26 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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