skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: A Nanowire Growth Technique Utilizing Focused Ion Beams

Abstract

The impact of high energy Ga ion beams focused to diameters below 100nm on substrates such as Ge and Sb offers a new approach for the formation of nanowires. In contrast to several well-known processes for bottom-up fabrication of one-dimensional nanostructures, for this process neither additional temperature treatment nor any additional material component is needed. The resulting nanostructures are completely amorphous and show very homogeneous diameters in the range of 15 to 30nm. Lengths up to several microns can be achieved.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Vienna University of Technology, Institute for Solid State Electronics, Floragasse 7, 1040 Vienna (Austria)
  2. Research Center Rossendorf Inc., Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, POB 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany)
  3. Vienna University of Technology, Institute for Solid State Physics, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, 1040 Vienna (Austria)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21055071
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 893; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: ICPS 2006: 28. international conference on the physics of semiconductors, Vienna (Austria), 24-28 Jul 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2729786; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ANTIMONY; CRYSTAL GROWTH; DEPOSITION; FABRICATION; GALLIUM IONS; GERMANIUM; GERMANIUM IONS; ION BEAMS; QUANTUM WIRES; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SUBSTRATES

Citation Formats

Schoendorfer, C., Lugstein, A., Hyun, Y. J., Bertagnolli, E., Bischoff, L., and Pongratz, P. A Nanowire Growth Technique Utilizing Focused Ion Beams. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2729786.
Schoendorfer, C., Lugstein, A., Hyun, Y. J., Bertagnolli, E., Bischoff, L., & Pongratz, P. A Nanowire Growth Technique Utilizing Focused Ion Beams. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2729786.
Schoendorfer, C., Lugstein, A., Hyun, Y. J., Bertagnolli, E., Bischoff, L., and Pongratz, P. Tue . "A Nanowire Growth Technique Utilizing Focused Ion Beams". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2729786.
@article{osti_21055071,
title = {A Nanowire Growth Technique Utilizing Focused Ion Beams},
author = {Schoendorfer, C. and Lugstein, A. and Hyun, Y. J. and Bertagnolli, E. and Bischoff, L. and Pongratz, P.},
abstractNote = {The impact of high energy Ga ion beams focused to diameters below 100nm on substrates such as Ge and Sb offers a new approach for the formation of nanowires. In contrast to several well-known processes for bottom-up fabrication of one-dimensional nanostructures, for this process neither additional temperature treatment nor any additional material component is needed. The resulting nanostructures are completely amorphous and show very homogeneous diameters in the range of 15 to 30nm. Lengths up to several microns can be achieved.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2729786},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 893,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 10 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue Apr 10 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • We present a focused ion beam-based approach for the synthesis of an antimony nanofiber network. The nanofibers, with a homogeneous distribution of diameters of about 25 nm and lengths up to several microns, are synthesized in a self-assembling process without any additional material source at room temperature. It is possible to recrystallize the as-grown amorphous nanofibers by moderate rapid thermal annealing at 473 K. These results have been verified by means of scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and energy dispersive x-ray analysis. As this approach is not limited solely to themore » material discussed here, other substrates (e.g., GaSb and Ge) and ion sources should extend this method to other materials, which offers a great potential for future nanoscale devices and applications.« less
  • In this work, a focused ion beam (FIB) milling process has been developed to fabricate 50 nm Bi nanowire and transistor structures using FEI-200 dual beam FIB system. For the fabrication, 50 nm bismuth film was thermally evaporated through EBL patterned PMMA windows onto SiO{sub 2} substrates with pre-defined contact pads. Bi nanowire widths ranging from 30 nm to 100 nm have been successfully fabricated by milling out unwanted areas using 30 KeV Ga+ ion beam. A single-pixel-line ion beam blanking technique has been utilised to fabricate Bi nanowire as small as 30 nm in diameter and few micrometers long.more » In order to form good ohmic contacts for sub 50 nm bismuth nanowires, a drill-and-fill process has been developed using FIB to sputter away the surface oxide of bismuth after the in-situ platinum nanowire contacts deposition. To our knowledge, this is the first time a focused ion beam process has been used to fabricate bismuth nanowire. The fabricated Bi nanowires were electrically characterised using a semiconductor analyser that showed good ohmic contact to the electrodes. In this paper, the fabrication experiments and the characterisation results for Bi nanowires as small as 50 nm in diameter are presented. Several FIB issues involved in Bi device making and ohmic contacts to Bi nanowires will also be discussed.« less
  • A new two-dimensional diode simulation code is used to show the possibility of using hemispherical diodes to produce converging ion beams in the 1--10-MA range. The pinched electron flow enhances ion emission, while suppressing electron emission, allowing I/subi//I/sube/>1. Such focused ion beams are of considerable interest for use in ablatively driven implosions of fusion targets. (AIP)
  • Gold catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid method is widely applied to III–V nanowire (NW) growth on Si substrate. However, the easy oxidation of Si, possible Si contamination in the NWs, high defect density in the NWs, and high sensitivity of the NW morphology to growth conditions largely limit its controllability. In this work, we developed a buffer layer technique by introducing a GaAs thin film with predefined polarity as a template. It is found that samples grown on these buffer layers all have high vertical NW yields in general, due to the single-orientation of the buffer layers. Low temperature buffer with smoother surfacemore » leads to highest yield of vertical NWs, while high temperature (HT) buffer with better crystallinity results in perfect NW quality. The defect-free property we observed here is very promising for optoelectronic device applications based on GaAs NW. Moreover, the buffer layers can eliminate Si contamination by preventing Si-Au alloy formation and by increasing the thickness of the Si diffusion barrier, thus providing more flexibility to vertical NW growth. The buffer layer technique we demonstrated here could be easily extended to other III-V on Si system for electronic and photonic applications.« less
  • A simple and rapid method is proposed for nanoscale patterning on a metallic glass surface using focused ion beam irradiation followed by wet etching. It was found that the etch rate of a metallic glass surface irradiated with Ga{sup +} ions could be drastically changed, and rapid patterning was possible with this method. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy observation reveals that the metallic glass substrate maintains an amorphous phase following irradiation. Etching enhancement was not observed for irradiation with Ar{sup +} ions. The results indicate that enhancement of etching results from the presence of implanted Ga{sup +} ions rather than amore » change in crystallography.« less