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Title: Photon Identification with Segmented Germanium Detectors in Low Radiation Environments

Abstract

Effective identification of photon-induced events is essential for a new generation of double beta-decay experiments. One such experiment is the GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, located at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) in Italy. It uses germanium, enriched in 76Ge, as source and detector, and aims at a background level of less than 10-3 counts/(kg {center_dot} keV {center_dot} y) in the region of the Q{beta}{beta}-value. Highly segmented detectors are being developed for this experiment. A detailed GEANT4 Monte Carlo study about the possibilities to identify photon--induced background was published previously. An 18-fold segmented prototype detector was tested and its performance compared with Monte Carlo predictions. The detector performed well and the agreement with the Monte Carlo is excellent.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. MPI fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21055036
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 897; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: LRT 2006: Topical workshop on low radioactivity techniques, Aussois (France), 1-4 Oct 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2722061; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; BACKGROUND RADIATION; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DOUBLE BETA DECAY; G CODES; GE SEMICONDUCTOR DETECTORS; GERMANIUM 76; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PARTICLE IDENTIFICATION; PARTICLE TRACKS; PERFORMANCE; PHOTONS

Citation Formats

Abt, I., Caldwell, A., Kroeninger, K., Liu, J., Liu, X., Majorovits, B., and Stelzer, F. Photon Identification with Segmented Germanium Detectors in Low Radiation Environments. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2722061.
Abt, I., Caldwell, A., Kroeninger, K., Liu, J., Liu, X., Majorovits, B., & Stelzer, F. Photon Identification with Segmented Germanium Detectors in Low Radiation Environments. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2722061.
Abt, I., Caldwell, A., Kroeninger, K., Liu, J., Liu, X., Majorovits, B., and Stelzer, F. Wed . "Photon Identification with Segmented Germanium Detectors in Low Radiation Environments". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2722061.
@article{osti_21055036,
title = {Photon Identification with Segmented Germanium Detectors in Low Radiation Environments},
author = {Abt, I. and Caldwell, A. and Kroeninger, K. and Liu, J. and Liu, X. and Majorovits, B. and Stelzer, F.},
abstractNote = {Effective identification of photon-induced events is essential for a new generation of double beta-decay experiments. One such experiment is the GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, located at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) in Italy. It uses germanium, enriched in 76Ge, as source and detector, and aims at a background level of less than 10-3 counts/(kg {center_dot} keV {center_dot} y) in the region of the Q{beta}{beta}-value. Highly segmented detectors are being developed for this experiment. A detailed GEANT4 Monte Carlo study about the possibilities to identify photon--induced background was published previously. An 18-fold segmented prototype detector was tested and its performance compared with Monte Carlo predictions. The detector performed well and the agreement with the Monte Carlo is excellent.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2722061},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 897,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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