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Title: Applications of the low-background gamma spectroscopy to the geographical origin of marine salts and prunes

Abstract

The low background gamma spectroscopy has been applied to try to sign the geographical origin of the French atlantic marine salts and of the prunes from Agen. Most of the activity measurements have been done using low background Ge spectrometers located in Bordeaux. Results have shown that a clear signature exists in the case of the French atlantic salts using the 40K, 137Cs and 226Ra isotopes but not in the case of the prunes.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, Chemin du Solarium, Le Haut Vigneau, BP120, 33175 Gradignan (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21055018
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 897; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: LRT 2006: Topical workshop on low radioactivity techniques, Aussois (France), 1-4 Oct 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2722080; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; CESIUM 137; ENVIRONMENTAL MATERIALS; GAMMA SPECTROSCOPY; GE SEMICONDUCTOR DETECTORS; OCEANOGRAPHY; POTASSIUM 40; RADIUM 226; SALTS

Citation Formats

Perrot, F. Applications of the low-background gamma spectroscopy to the geographical origin of marine salts and prunes. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2722080.
Perrot, F. Applications of the low-background gamma spectroscopy to the geographical origin of marine salts and prunes. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2722080.
Perrot, F. Wed . "Applications of the low-background gamma spectroscopy to the geographical origin of marine salts and prunes". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2722080.
@article{osti_21055018,
title = {Applications of the low-background gamma spectroscopy to the geographical origin of marine salts and prunes},
author = {Perrot, F.},
abstractNote = {The low background gamma spectroscopy has been applied to try to sign the geographical origin of the French atlantic marine salts and of the prunes from Agen. Most of the activity measurements have been done using low background Ge spectrometers located in Bordeaux. Results have shown that a clear signature exists in the case of the French atlantic salts using the 40K, 137Cs and 226Ra isotopes but not in the case of the prunes.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2722080},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 897,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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