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Title: Archaeological Lead Findings in the Ukraine

Abstract

In June-August 2006 an expedition with the aim to look for low-radioactive archaeological lead at the bottom of the Black Sea, near the Crimean peninsula (Ukraine) was organised by a Korean-Ukrainian collaboration. The first samples with {approx}0.2 tons of total mass were found at a depth of 28 m among the relics of an ancient Greek ship. Their age has been dated to the first century B.C. This lead was used as ballast in the keel of the ship. The element composition of the samples was measured by means of X-ray fluorescence and ICP-MS analyses. The first preliminary limits on the 210Pb contamination of the samples are less than a few hundreds mBq/kg. The measurements were performed using gamma spectroscopy with HPGe-detectors and alpha spectroscopy with commercial {alpha}-detectors. Measurements of 40K, Th/U in the lead samples were undertaken in Kiev and in the underground laboratories of the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS, Italy). If it was found to be radio-clean this lead could be used as high efficiency shield for ultra low-level detectors, and as raw material for growing radio-pure scintillation crystals such as PbMoO4 or PbWO4 for the search for rare processes.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]; ;  [6];  [7]
  1. Institute for Nuclear Research, Kiev (Ukraine)
  2. DMRC, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea (Korea, Republic of)
  3. (Korea, Republic of)
  4. Physics Department, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)
  5. Institute for Hydrometeorology Research, Kiev (Ukraine)
  6. Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy)
  7. Department of Underwater Heritage, Institute of Archaeology, Kiev (Ukraine)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21055017
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 897; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: LRT 2006: Topical workshop on low radioactivity techniques, Aussois (France), 1-4 Oct 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2722079; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ALPHA DETECTION; ALPHA SPECTROSCOPY; CONTAMINATION; CRYSTALS; EFFICIENCY; FLUORESCENCE; GAMMA SPECTROSCOPY; HIGH-PURITY GE DETECTORS; ICP MASS SPECTROSCOPY; LEAD; LEAD 210; LEAD TUNGSTATES; POTASSIUM 40; RADIOACTIVITY; SCINTILLATIONS; SHIELDS; SOLID SCINTILLATION DETECTORS; THORIUM 232; UKRAINE; URANIUM 238

Citation Formats

Danevich, F. A., Kobychev, V. V., Kropivyansky, B. N., Mokina, V. M., Nagorny, S. S., Nikolaiko, A. S., Poda, D. V., Tretyak, V. I., Kim, S. K., School of Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul, Kim, H. J., Kostezh, A. B., Laubenstein, M., Nisi, S., and Voronov, S. A. Archaeological Lead Findings in the Ukraine. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2722079.
Danevich, F. A., Kobychev, V. V., Kropivyansky, B. N., Mokina, V. M., Nagorny, S. S., Nikolaiko, A. S., Poda, D. V., Tretyak, V. I., Kim, S. K., School of Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul, Kim, H. J., Kostezh, A. B., Laubenstein, M., Nisi, S., & Voronov, S. A. Archaeological Lead Findings in the Ukraine. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2722079.
Danevich, F. A., Kobychev, V. V., Kropivyansky, B. N., Mokina, V. M., Nagorny, S. S., Nikolaiko, A. S., Poda, D. V., Tretyak, V. I., Kim, S. K., School of Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul, Kim, H. J., Kostezh, A. B., Laubenstein, M., Nisi, S., and Voronov, S. A. Wed . "Archaeological Lead Findings in the Ukraine". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2722079.
@article{osti_21055017,
title = {Archaeological Lead Findings in the Ukraine},
author = {Danevich, F. A. and Kobychev, V. V. and Kropivyansky, B. N. and Mokina, V. M. and Nagorny, S. S. and Nikolaiko, A. S. and Poda, D. V. and Tretyak, V. I. and Kim, S. K. and School of Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul and Kim, H. J. and Kostezh, A. B. and Laubenstein, M. and Nisi, S. and Voronov, S. A.},
abstractNote = {In June-August 2006 an expedition with the aim to look for low-radioactive archaeological lead at the bottom of the Black Sea, near the Crimean peninsula (Ukraine) was organised by a Korean-Ukrainian collaboration. The first samples with {approx}0.2 tons of total mass were found at a depth of 28 m among the relics of an ancient Greek ship. Their age has been dated to the first century B.C. This lead was used as ballast in the keel of the ship. The element composition of the samples was measured by means of X-ray fluorescence and ICP-MS analyses. The first preliminary limits on the 210Pb contamination of the samples are less than a few hundreds mBq/kg. The measurements were performed using gamma spectroscopy with HPGe-detectors and alpha spectroscopy with commercial {alpha}-detectors. Measurements of 40K, Th/U in the lead samples were undertaken in Kiev and in the underground laboratories of the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS, Italy). If it was found to be radio-clean this lead could be used as high efficiency shield for ultra low-level detectors, and as raw material for growing radio-pure scintillation crystals such as PbMoO4 or PbWO4 for the search for rare processes.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2722079},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 897,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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