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Title: Further Development of the Simulation of Sonic IR Imaging of Cracks in Metals with Finite-Element Models

Abstract

Sonic IR imaging, which combines infrared imaging and ultrasound excitation, as a relative new member of the NDE family, has been drawing wider and wider attention due to its fast, wide area inspection capability. In our previous presentations and publications, we have described the application of acoustic chaos to Sonic IR imaging and have provided experimental illustrations as well. In addition, we have described realistic finite-element models that simulate the heating of cracks in metals by both chaotic and non-chaotic sound. These models allow for both friction and plastic deformation as sources of heating. In this paper, we present our further study on the physical mechanisms that are responsible for the advantages of chaotic sound for Sonic IR crack detection. Using finite-element analysis, here we will present theoretical explanations, both for the origin of the chaos, and for the mechanisms responsible for the chaotic enhancement of crack detection.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)
  2. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)
  3. Institute for Manufacturing Research, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)
  4. Physics Department, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)
  5. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21054973
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 894; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: Conference on review of progress in quantitative nondestructive evaluation, Portland, OR (United States), 30 Jul - 4 Aug 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2718009; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CHAOS THEORY; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; CRACKS; DETECTION; EXCITATION; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; FRICTION; HEATING; METALS; PLASTICITY; SOUND WAVES; ULTRASONIC TESTING

Citation Formats

Han Xiaoyan, Islam, Md. Sarwar, Newaz, G. M., Favro, L. D., Thomas, R. L., and College of Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202. Further Development of the Simulation of Sonic IR Imaging of Cracks in Metals with Finite-Element Models. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2718009.
Han Xiaoyan, Islam, Md. Sarwar, Newaz, G. M., Favro, L. D., Thomas, R. L., & College of Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202. Further Development of the Simulation of Sonic IR Imaging of Cracks in Metals with Finite-Element Models. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2718009.
Han Xiaoyan, Islam, Md. Sarwar, Newaz, G. M., Favro, L. D., Thomas, R. L., and College of Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202. Wed . "Further Development of the Simulation of Sonic IR Imaging of Cracks in Metals with Finite-Element Models". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2718009.
@article{osti_21054973,
title = {Further Development of the Simulation of Sonic IR Imaging of Cracks in Metals with Finite-Element Models},
author = {Han Xiaoyan and Islam, Md. Sarwar and Newaz, G. M. and Favro, L. D. and Thomas, R. L. and College of Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202},
abstractNote = {Sonic IR imaging, which combines infrared imaging and ultrasound excitation, as a relative new member of the NDE family, has been drawing wider and wider attention due to its fast, wide area inspection capability. In our previous presentations and publications, we have described the application of acoustic chaos to Sonic IR imaging and have provided experimental illustrations as well. In addition, we have described realistic finite-element models that simulate the heating of cracks in metals by both chaotic and non-chaotic sound. These models allow for both friction and plastic deformation as sources of heating. In this paper, we present our further study on the physical mechanisms that are responsible for the advantages of chaotic sound for Sonic IR crack detection. Using finite-element analysis, here we will present theoretical explanations, both for the origin of the chaos, and for the mechanisms responsible for the chaotic enhancement of crack detection.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2718009},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 894,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 21 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed Mar 21 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}