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Title: Further Development of the Simulation of Sonic IR Imaging of Cracks in Metals with Finite-Element Models

Abstract

Sonic IR imaging, which combines infrared imaging and ultrasound excitation, as a relative new member of the NDE family, has been drawing wider and wider attention due to its fast, wide area inspection capability. In our previous presentations and publications, we have described the application of acoustic chaos to Sonic IR imaging and have provided experimental illustrations as well. In addition, we have described realistic finite-element models that simulate the heating of cracks in metals by both chaotic and non-chaotic sound. These models allow for both friction and plastic deformation as sources of heating. In this paper, we present our further study on the physical mechanisms that are responsible for the advantages of chaotic sound for Sonic IR crack detection. Using finite-element analysis, here we will present theoretical explanations, both for the origin of the chaos, and for the mechanisms responsible for the chaotic enhancement of crack detection.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)
  2. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)
  3. Institute for Manufacturing Research, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)
  4. Physics Department, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)
  5. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21054973
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 894; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: Conference on review of progress in quantitative nondestructive evaluation, Portland, OR (United States), 30 Jul - 4 Aug 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2718009; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CHAOS THEORY; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; CRACKS; DETECTION; EXCITATION; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; FRICTION; HEATING; METALS; PLASTICITY; SOUND WAVES; ULTRASONIC TESTING

Citation Formats

Han Xiaoyan, Islam, Md. Sarwar, Newaz, G. M., Favro, L. D., Thomas, R. L., and College of Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202. Further Development of the Simulation of Sonic IR Imaging of Cracks in Metals with Finite-Element Models. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2718009.
Han Xiaoyan, Islam, Md. Sarwar, Newaz, G. M., Favro, L. D., Thomas, R. L., & College of Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202. Further Development of the Simulation of Sonic IR Imaging of Cracks in Metals with Finite-Element Models. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2718009.
Han Xiaoyan, Islam, Md. Sarwar, Newaz, G. M., Favro, L. D., Thomas, R. L., and College of Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202. Wed . "Further Development of the Simulation of Sonic IR Imaging of Cracks in Metals with Finite-Element Models". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2718009.
@article{osti_21054973,
title = {Further Development of the Simulation of Sonic IR Imaging of Cracks in Metals with Finite-Element Models},
author = {Han Xiaoyan and Islam, Md. Sarwar and Newaz, G. M. and Favro, L. D. and Thomas, R. L. and College of Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202},
abstractNote = {Sonic IR imaging, which combines infrared imaging and ultrasound excitation, as a relative new member of the NDE family, has been drawing wider and wider attention due to its fast, wide area inspection capability. In our previous presentations and publications, we have described the application of acoustic chaos to Sonic IR imaging and have provided experimental illustrations as well. In addition, we have described realistic finite-element models that simulate the heating of cracks in metals by both chaotic and non-chaotic sound. These models allow for both friction and plastic deformation as sources of heating. In this paper, we present our further study on the physical mechanisms that are responsible for the advantages of chaotic sound for Sonic IR crack detection. Using finite-element analysis, here we will present theoretical explanations, both for the origin of the chaos, and for the mechanisms responsible for the chaotic enhancement of crack detection.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2718009},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 894,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 21 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed Mar 21 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • It has been previously shown experimentally that the use of chaotic sound, instead of a pure frequency, greatly enhances the heating, and hence the detectability of cracks using sonic infrared imaging (SIR). In this paper we show an example of the enhancement of crack heating through the use of chaotic sound. We also present the results of a finite element calculation, in which chaotic sound occurs spontaneously. This modeling confirms the experimental result that chaotic sound is more efficient than non-chaotic sound excitation for heating the cracks.
  • Stress intensity factors for thru-thickness and thumb-nail cracks in the double edge notch specimens, containing two different notch radius (R) to specimen width (W) ratios (R/W = 1/8 and 1/16), are calculated through finite element analysis. The finite element results are compared with predictions based on existing empirical models for SIF calculations. The effects of a change in R/W ratio on SIF of thru-thickness and thumb-nail cracks are also discussed. 34 refs.
  • A hybrid model to simulate the ultrasonic array response from stress corrosion cracks is presented. These cracks are branched and difficult to detect so the model is required to enable optimization of an array design. An efficient frequency-domain finite element method is described and selected to simulate the ultrasonic scattering. Experimental validation results are presented, followed by an example of the simulated ultrasonic array response from a real stress corrosion crack whose geometry is obtained from an X-ray Computed Tomography image. A simulation-assisted array design methodology, which includes the model and use of real crack geometries, is proposed.
  • A physically-based crystal plasticity framework for modeling irradiation growth and creep is interfaced with the finite element code ABAQUS in order to study the contact forces and the gap evolution between the spacer grid and the cladding tube as a function of irradiation in a representative section of a fuel rod assembly. Deformation mechanisms governing the gap opening are identified and correlated to the texture-dependent material response. Thus, in the absence of coolant flow-induced vibrations, these simulations predict the contribution of irradiation growth and creep to the gap opening between the cladding tube and the springs and dimples on themore » spacer grid. The simulated contact forces on the springs and dimples are compared to available experimental and modeling data. Various combinations of external loads are applied on the springs and dimples to simulate fuel rods in the interior and at the periphery of the fuel rod assembly. Furthermore, we found that loading conditions representative (to a first order approximation) of fuel rods at the periphery show higher gap opening. This is in agreement with in-reactor data, where rod leakages due to the synergistic effects of gap opening and coolant flow-induced vibrations were generally found to occur at the periphery of the fuel rod assembly.« less