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Title: Detecting Which Slit Property and an Incompatible One Without Erasure

Abstract

In a typical double-slit experiment, we seek for properties incompatible with Which Slit property, which can be detected without erasing the information about which slit each particle localized on the final screen passed through. It is found that these properties exist if the dimension of the Hilbert space describing the position of the particle is at least 4, but they can have a non-trivial character only if such a dimension is at least 6. An ideal experiment realizing this non-trivial detection without erasure is designed.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita della Calabria, via P. Bucci 30b, 87036, Rende (Italy)
  2. (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21054916
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 889; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 4. international conference on foundations of probability and physics, Vaexjoe (Sweden), 4-9 Jun 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2713483; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; DETECTION; DIFFRACTION; HILBERT SPACE; INFORMATION; QUANTUM MECHANICS; UNCERTAINTY PRINCIPLE; WAVE FUNCTIONS

Citation Formats

Nistico, G., and Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare. Detecting Which Slit Property and an Incompatible One Without Erasure. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2713483.
Nistico, G., & Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare. Detecting Which Slit Property and an Incompatible One Without Erasure. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2713483.
Nistico, G., and Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare. Wed . "Detecting Which Slit Property and an Incompatible One Without Erasure". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2713483.
@article{osti_21054916,
title = {Detecting Which Slit Property and an Incompatible One Without Erasure},
author = {Nistico, G. and Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare},
abstractNote = {In a typical double-slit experiment, we seek for properties incompatible with Which Slit property, which can be detected without erasing the information about which slit each particle localized on the final screen passed through. It is found that these properties exist if the dimension of the Hilbert space describing the position of the particle is at least 4, but they can have a non-trivial character only if such a dimension is at least 6. An ideal experiment realizing this non-trivial detection without erasure is designed.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2713483},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 889,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 21 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Wed Feb 21 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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