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Title: Nuclear mass forecasting: can observed pattern determine mass values?

Abstract

Theoretical prediction of nuclear masses is analyzed as a pattern recognition problem on the N-Z plane. A global pattern is observed by plotting the differences between measured masses and Liquid Drop Model (LDM) predictions. After unfolding the data by removing the smooth LDM mass contributions, the remaining microscopic effects have proved difficult to model, although they display a striking pattern. These deviations carry information related to shell closures, nuclear deformation and the residual nuclear interactions. In the present work the more than 2000 known nuclear masses are studied as an array in the N-Z plane viewed through a mask, behind which the approximately 7000 unknown unstable nuclei that can exist between the proton and neutron drip lines are hidden. Employing a Fourier transform deconvolution method these masses can be predicted. Measured masses are reconstructed with and r.m.s. error of less than 200 keV. The existence of an island of stability around (Z{approx_equal} 116, N{approx_equal} 194) is strongly suggested. Other potential applications of the present approach are outlined.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-543, 04510 Mexico DF (Mexico)
  2. Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-348, 04511 Mexico DF(Mexico)
  3. GANIL, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21054886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 884; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 6. Latin American symposium on nuclear physics and applications, Iguazu (Argentina), 3-7 Oct 2005; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2710558; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; FOURIER TRANSFORMATION; KEV RANGE; LIQUID DROP MODEL; NEUTRONS; NUCLEAR DEFORMATION; NUCLEI; PATTERN RECOGNITION; POTENTIALS; PROTONS; SHELL MODELS; STABILITY

Citation Formats

Frank, A., Lopez Vieyra, J. C., Barea, J., Hirsch, J. G., Velazquez, V., and Isacker, P. van. Nuclear mass forecasting: can observed pattern determine mass values?. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2710558.
Frank, A., Lopez Vieyra, J. C., Barea, J., Hirsch, J. G., Velazquez, V., & Isacker, P. van. Nuclear mass forecasting: can observed pattern determine mass values?. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2710558.
Frank, A., Lopez Vieyra, J. C., Barea, J., Hirsch, J. G., Velazquez, V., and Isacker, P. van. Mon . "Nuclear mass forecasting: can observed pattern determine mass values?". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2710558.
@article{osti_21054886,
title = {Nuclear mass forecasting: can observed pattern determine mass values?},
author = {Frank, A. and Lopez Vieyra, J. C. and Barea, J. and Hirsch, J. G. and Velazquez, V. and Isacker, P. van},
abstractNote = {Theoretical prediction of nuclear masses is analyzed as a pattern recognition problem on the N-Z plane. A global pattern is observed by plotting the differences between measured masses and Liquid Drop Model (LDM) predictions. After unfolding the data by removing the smooth LDM mass contributions, the remaining microscopic effects have proved difficult to model, although they display a striking pattern. These deviations carry information related to shell closures, nuclear deformation and the residual nuclear interactions. In the present work the more than 2000 known nuclear masses are studied as an array in the N-Z plane viewed through a mask, behind which the approximately 7000 unknown unstable nuclei that can exist between the proton and neutron drip lines are hidden. Employing a Fourier transform deconvolution method these masses can be predicted. Measured masses are reconstructed with and r.m.s. error of less than 200 keV. The existence of an island of stability around (Z{approx_equal} 116, N{approx_equal} 194) is strongly suggested. Other potential applications of the present approach are outlined.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2710558},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 884,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 12 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Feb 12 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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