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Title: In vivo evaluation of Fe in human skin employing X-Ray Fluorescence Methodology (XRF)

Abstract

Recent technological improvements allow the method of in vivo XRF to provide useful sensibility for diagnostics or monitoring in biomedical applications. In cases of hereditary sanguine disorders as the {beta}-thalassaemia or a genetic disorder like Haemochromatosis, there is a high concentration of elements as Fe, Zn and Cu in the skin and internal organs, due to the treatment of those abnormalities or due to the own dysfunction caused by the disease. The levels of Fe related to the patient bearers of the {beta}-thalassaemia are determined, at the moment, measuring a protein in the sanguine current, called ferritin. The monitoring of the protein is ineffective in several situations, such as when the patient suffers any disturbance of health. Nowadays, the main forms of measuring the levels of those metals through hepatic storage are the biopsy of the liver, that is invasive and potentially dangerous, presenting a rate of mortality of 0.1%, and by means of magnetic susceptibilities that employs a quantum superconductor, which is highly expensive and there are only three main world centers with this equipment This work investigates the use of a Si PIN-diode detector and a 238Pu source (13 and 17keV; 13%; 95.2mCi; 86y) for the measurement ofmore » Fe skin levels compatible with those associated to the disease {beta}-thalassaemia. XRF spectra were analyzed using a set of AXIL-WinQXAS programs elaborated and disseminated by the IAEA. The determination coefficient of the calibration model (sensitivity curve) was 0.97. Measurements on skin phantoms containing concentrations of Fe in the range from 10 to 150 parts per million (ppm), indicate that we are able to detect Fe at levels of the order of 15ppm, using monitoring periods of 50 seconds and skin entrance dose less than 10 mSv, The literature reports skin Fe levels from 15.0 to 60.0 ppm in normal persons and from 70 to 150 ppm in thalassaemics patients. So, the employed methodology allows the measurement of the skin Fe concentration.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. State University of Londrina, Department of Physics, Londrina, PR (Brazil)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21054869
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 884; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 6. Latin American symposium on nuclear physics and applications, Iguazu (Argentina), 3-7 Oct 2005; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2710631; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; A CODES; BIOPSY; CALIBRATION; DISEASES; EVALUATION; FERRITIN; FLUORESCENCE; IN VIVO; IRON; LIVER; MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY; MONITORING; PATIENTS; PHANTOMS; PLUTONIUM 238; SENSITIVITY; SKIN; X RADIATION; X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS; YTTRIUM 86

Citation Formats

Estevam, M., and Appoloni, C. R. In vivo evaluation of Fe in human skin employing X-Ray Fluorescence Methodology (XRF). United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2710631.
Estevam, M., & Appoloni, C. R. In vivo evaluation of Fe in human skin employing X-Ray Fluorescence Methodology (XRF). United States. doi:10.1063/1.2710631.
Estevam, M., and Appoloni, C. R. Mon . "In vivo evaluation of Fe in human skin employing X-Ray Fluorescence Methodology (XRF)". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2710631.
@article{osti_21054869,
title = {In vivo evaluation of Fe in human skin employing X-Ray Fluorescence Methodology (XRF)},
author = {Estevam, M. and Appoloni, C. R.},
abstractNote = {Recent technological improvements allow the method of in vivo XRF to provide useful sensibility for diagnostics or monitoring in biomedical applications. In cases of hereditary sanguine disorders as the {beta}-thalassaemia or a genetic disorder like Haemochromatosis, there is a high concentration of elements as Fe, Zn and Cu in the skin and internal organs, due to the treatment of those abnormalities or due to the own dysfunction caused by the disease. The levels of Fe related to the patient bearers of the {beta}-thalassaemia are determined, at the moment, measuring a protein in the sanguine current, called ferritin. The monitoring of the protein is ineffective in several situations, such as when the patient suffers any disturbance of health. Nowadays, the main forms of measuring the levels of those metals through hepatic storage are the biopsy of the liver, that is invasive and potentially dangerous, presenting a rate of mortality of 0.1%, and by means of magnetic susceptibilities that employs a quantum superconductor, which is highly expensive and there are only three main world centers with this equipment This work investigates the use of a Si PIN-diode detector and a 238Pu source (13 and 17keV; 13%; 95.2mCi; 86y) for the measurement of Fe skin levels compatible with those associated to the disease {beta}-thalassaemia. XRF spectra were analyzed using a set of AXIL-WinQXAS programs elaborated and disseminated by the IAEA. The determination coefficient of the calibration model (sensitivity curve) was 0.97. Measurements on skin phantoms containing concentrations of Fe in the range from 10 to 150 parts per million (ppm), indicate that we are able to detect Fe at levels of the order of 15ppm, using monitoring periods of 50 seconds and skin entrance dose less than 10 mSv, The literature reports skin Fe levels from 15.0 to 60.0 ppm in normal persons and from 70 to 150 ppm in thalassaemics patients. So, the employed methodology allows the measurement of the skin Fe concentration.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2710631},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 884,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 12 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Feb 12 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • No abstract prepared.
  • Slag material produced by the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) varies in chemical composition due to the heterogeneous nature of the input sample feed. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a spectroscopic technique which has been evaluated to perform elemental analyses on surrogate slag material for process control. Vitreous slag samples were ground to a fine powder in an impact ball mill and analyzed directly using laboratory prepared standards. The fluorescent intensities of Si, Al and Fe in the slag samples was utilized to determine the appropriate matrix standard set for the determination of Ce. The samples were analyzed for Cr, Ni, Femore » and Ce using a wavelength dispersive XRF polychromator. Split samples were dissolved and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES). The precision of the XRF technique was better than 5% RSD. The limit of detection for Ce varied with sample matrix and was typically below 0.01% by weight. The linear dynamic range for the technique was evaluated over two orders of magnitude. Typical calibration standards ranged from 0.01% Ce to 1% Ce. The Ce determinations performed directly on ground slag material by the XRF techniques were similar to ICP-AES analyses. Various chemical dissolution and sample preparation techniques were evaluated for the analysis of Ce in slag samples. A fusion procedure utilizing LiBO{sub 2} was found to provide reliable analyses for the actinide surrogate in a variety of slag matrices. The use of the XRF technique reduced the time of analysis for Ce and Cr from three days to one day for five samples. No additional waste streams were created from the analyses by the XRF technique, while the ICP technique generated several liters of liquid waste.« less
  • Endovascular revascularization of the femoropopliteal (FP) artery has been limited by high rates of restenosis and stent fracture. The unique physical forces that are applied to the FP artery during leg movement have been implicated in these phenomena. The foundation for measuring the effects of physical forces on the FP artery in a clinically relevant environment is based on the ability to develop 3D models of this vessel in different leg positions in vivo in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). By acquiring paired angiographic images of the FP artery, and using angiography-based 3D modeling algorithms previously validated in themore » coronary arteries, the authors generated 3D models of ten FP arteries in nine patients with PAD with the lower extremity in straight leg (SL) and crossed leg (CL) positions. Due to the length of the FP artery, overlapping paired angiographic images of the entire FP artery were required to image the entire vessel, which necessitated the development of a novel fusion process in order to generate a 3D model of the entire FP artery. The methodology of angiographic acquisition and 3D model generation of the FP artery is described. In a subset of patients, a third angiographic view (i.e., validation view) was acquired in addition to the standard paired views for the purpose of validating the 3D modeling process. The mean root-mean-square (rms) error of the point-to-point distances between the centerline of the main FP artery from the 2D validation view and the centerline from the 3D model placed in the validation view for the SL and CL positions were 0.93{+-}0.19 mm and 1.12{+-}0.25 mm, respectively. Similarly, the mean rms error of the same comparison for the main FP artery and sidebranches for the SL and CL positions were 1.09{+-}0.38 mm and 1.21{+-}0.25 mm, respectively. A separate validation of the novel fusion process was performed by comparing the 3D model of the FP artery derived from fusion of 3D models of adjacent FP segments with the 2D validation view incorporating the region of fusion. The mean rms error of vessel centerline points of the main FP artery, the main FP artery plus directly connected sidebranches, and the mean rms error of upstream, downstream, and sidebranch directional vectors at bifurcation points in the overlap region were 1.41{+-}0.79 mm, 2.13{+-}1.12 mm, 3.16{+-}3.72 deg., 3.60{+-}5.39 deg., and 8.68{+-}8.42 deg. in the SL position, respectively, and 1.29{+-}0.35 mm, 1.61{+-}0.78 mm, 4.68{+-}4.08 deg., 3.41{+-}2.23 deg., and 5.52{+-}4.41 deg. in the CL position, respectively. Inter- and intraobserver variability in the generation of 3D models of individual FP segments and the fusion of overlapping FP segments were assessed. The mean rms errors between the centerlines of nine 3D models of individual FP segments generated by two independent observers, and repeated measurement by the same observer were 2.78{+-}1.26 mm and 3.50{+-}1.15 mm, respectively. The mean rms errors between the centerline of four 3D models of fused overlapping FP segments generated by two independent observers, and repeated measurement by the same observer were 4.99{+-}0.99 mm and 5.98{+-}1.22 mm, respectively. This study documents the ability to generate 3D models of the entire FP artery in vivo in patients with PAD in both SL and CL positions using routine angiography, and validates the methodologies used.« less
  • Traditionally, clinical studies of lead`s effect on health have relied on blood lead levels to indicate lead exposure. However, this is unsatisfactory because blood lead levels have a half-life of approximately 5 weeks, and thus reflect recent exposure. Over 90% of the lead body burden is in bone, and it is thought to have a long residence time, thus implying that measurements of bone lead reflect cumulative exposure. So, measurements of bone lead are useful in understanding the long-term health effects of lead. Ahlgren reported the first noninvasive measurements of bone lead in humans, where {gamma}-rays from {sup 57}Co weremore » used to excite the K series x-rays of lead. The lead detection system at McMaster University uses a {sup 109}Cd source which is positioned at the center of the detector face (HPGe) and a near backscatter ({approx}160{degrees}) geometry. This arrangement allows great flexibility, since one can sample lead in a range of different bone sites due to a robust normalization technique which eliminates the need to correct for bone geometry, thickness of overlying tissue, and other related factors. The effective radiation dose to an adult during an x-ray fluorescence bone lead measurement is extremely low, being 35 nSv. This paper addresses the issue of how bone, whole blood, and serum lead concentrations can be related in order to understand a person`s lead exposure history.« less