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Title: The LERIX User Facility

Abstract

We describe the lower energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (LERIX) spectrometer, located at sector 20 PNC-XOR of the Advanced Photon Source. This instrument, which is now available to general users, is the first user facility optimized for high throughput measurements of momentum transfer dependent nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) from the core shell electrons of relatively light elements or the less-tightly bound electrons of heavier elements. By means of example, we present new NRIXS measurements of the near-edge structure for the L-edges of Al and the K-edge in Si.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98105 (United States)
  2. Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21054777
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 882; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: XAFS13: 13. international conference on X-ray absorption fine structure, Stanford, CA (United States), 9-14 Jul 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2644702; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE; ALUMINIUM; ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE; ELECTRONS; ENERGY RESOLUTION; MOMENTUM TRANSFER; PNC; SILICON; X-RAY DIFFRACTION; X-RAY SPECTROMETERS; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Seidler, G. T., Fister, T. T., Nagle, K. P., and Cross, J. O. The LERIX User Facility. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2644702.
Seidler, G. T., Fister, T. T., Nagle, K. P., & Cross, J. O. The LERIX User Facility. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2644702.
Seidler, G. T., Fister, T. T., Nagle, K. P., and Cross, J. O. Fri . "The LERIX User Facility". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2644702.
@article{osti_21054777,
title = {The LERIX User Facility},
author = {Seidler, G. T. and Fister, T. T. and Nagle, K. P. and Cross, J. O.},
abstractNote = {We describe the lower energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (LERIX) spectrometer, located at sector 20 PNC-XOR of the Advanced Photon Source. This instrument, which is now available to general users, is the first user facility optimized for high throughput measurements of momentum transfer dependent nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) from the core shell electrons of relatively light elements or the less-tightly bound electrons of heavier elements. By means of example, we present new NRIXS measurements of the near-edge structure for the L-edges of Al and the K-edge in Si.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2644702},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 882,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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