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Title: Advantages of an Automated Chemical Processor for XAFS Analysis of Novel Materials

Abstract

For synthetic chemists and material scientists, XAFS analysis is typically used after promising samples have already been identified. This is not an inherent limitation of the technique, which can be applied in a crude fashion quite rapidly, but is rather an artifact of the separation of laboratory from synchrotron, and of the nature of the allocation of beam time. One way around these difficulties is to use automated chemical processors; preferably with identical machines at the home institution and at the beamline. This allows identical samples to be synthesized on demand in both locations, so that the characterization resources of the home institution's laboratory can be applied immediately to samples synthesized at the beamline. In addition, the processor can be run in a combinatorial mode, so that the XAFS of many possible synthesis results are examined in a short time. Finally, spectra possessing features of interest can be identified by software, and those syntheses singled out for further study.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Sarah Lawrence College, 1 Mead Way, Bronxville, NY 10708 (United States)
  2. Dept. of Chemistry, Virginia Commonwealth University, 1001 W. Main St., PO Box 842006, Richmond, VA 23284 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21054766
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 882; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: XAFS13: 13. international conference on X-ray absorption fine structure, Stanford, CA (United States), 9-14 Jul 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2644690; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ABSORPTION SPECTRA; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; COMPUTER CALCULATIONS; COMPUTER CODES; FINE STRUCTURE; SYNTHESIS; X-RAY SPECTRA; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Calvin, S., and Carpenter, E. E. Advantages of an Automated Chemical Processor for XAFS Analysis of Novel Materials. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2644690.
Calvin, S., & Carpenter, E. E. Advantages of an Automated Chemical Processor for XAFS Analysis of Novel Materials. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2644690.
Calvin, S., and Carpenter, E. E. Fri . "Advantages of an Automated Chemical Processor for XAFS Analysis of Novel Materials". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2644690.
@article{osti_21054766,
title = {Advantages of an Automated Chemical Processor for XAFS Analysis of Novel Materials},
author = {Calvin, S. and Carpenter, E. E.},
abstractNote = {For synthetic chemists and material scientists, XAFS analysis is typically used after promising samples have already been identified. This is not an inherent limitation of the technique, which can be applied in a crude fashion quite rapidly, but is rather an artifact of the separation of laboratory from synchrotron, and of the nature of the allocation of beam time. One way around these difficulties is to use automated chemical processors; preferably with identical machines at the home institution and at the beamline. This allows identical samples to be synthesized on demand in both locations, so that the characterization resources of the home institution's laboratory can be applied immediately to samples synthesized at the beamline. In addition, the processor can be run in a combinatorial mode, so that the XAFS of many possible synthesis results are examined in a short time. Finally, spectra possessing features of interest can be identified by software, and those syntheses singled out for further study.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2644690},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 882,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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