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Title: In Situ EXAFS and TEM Investigations of Ag Nanoparticles in Glass

Abstract

Ag particle-glass composites produced by ion exchange processes of soda-lime glasses were investigated by EXAFS spectroscopy at the Ag K-edge. The spectra measured at 10 K were used to characterize the structure of nanoparticles as a result of ion exchange. The evolution of Ag K-edge EXAFS oscillations measured by in situ heating at 823 K as a function of time clearly shows an increase of Ag-Ag distance and coordination number caused by annealing. Together with transmission electron microscopy characterization a preferred growth of Ag particles with respect to nucleation has been found that leads to increased particle sizes in deeper glass regions.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics, University of Halle-Wittenberg, Friedemann-Bach-Platz 6, D-06108 Halle (Germany)
  2. Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21054734
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 882; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: XAFS13: 13. international conference on X-ray absorption fine structure, Stanford, CA (United States), 9-14 Jul 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2644650; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; ANNEALING; COMPOSITE MATERIALS; COORDINATION NUMBER; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; FINE STRUCTURE; GLASS; ION EXCHANGE; NANOSTRUCTURES; NUCLEATION; PARTICLE SIZE; PARTICLES; SILVER; SODIUM CARBONATES; TIME DEPENDENCE; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Schneider, R., Dubiel, M., Haug, J., and Hofmeister, H.. In Situ EXAFS and TEM Investigations of Ag Nanoparticles in Glass. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2644650.
Schneider, R., Dubiel, M., Haug, J., & Hofmeister, H.. In Situ EXAFS and TEM Investigations of Ag Nanoparticles in Glass. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2644650.
Schneider, R., Dubiel, M., Haug, J., and Hofmeister, H.. Fri . "In Situ EXAFS and TEM Investigations of Ag Nanoparticles in Glass". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2644650.
@article{osti_21054734,
title = {In Situ EXAFS and TEM Investigations of Ag Nanoparticles in Glass},
author = {Schneider, R. and Dubiel, M. and Haug, J. and Hofmeister, H.},
abstractNote = {Ag particle-glass composites produced by ion exchange processes of soda-lime glasses were investigated by EXAFS spectroscopy at the Ag K-edge. The spectra measured at 10 K were used to characterize the structure of nanoparticles as a result of ion exchange. The evolution of Ag K-edge EXAFS oscillations measured by in situ heating at 823 K as a function of time clearly shows an increase of Ag-Ag distance and coordination number caused by annealing. Together with transmission electron microscopy characterization a preferred growth of Ag particles with respect to nucleation has been found that leads to increased particle sizes in deeper glass regions.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2644650},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 882,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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